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Tucson Arizona AZ Warrant Search

If you want to search for outstanding arrest warrants in Tucson Arizona AZ - the easiest and safest way would be to use an online warrant search service that will allow you to gather information from several different local and national databases and provide you with a detailed report regarding the individual's warrant status, without leaving the comfort of your home or office.

If you are doing a new search on yourself, it is recommended that you use govwarrantsearch.org. This is a discreet warrant search service that will allow you to search anonymously without fear of prosecution. This is probably one of the most trusted and thorough services in the industry.

With govwarrantsearch.org, you will have access to the same technology that both law enforcement and private investigators use on a daily basis. The service will compile everything about your subject in one detailed report and make for easy analysis. Having all of this information in less than a minute is as easy as filling out the form above.

If you prefer the "manual" approach - You can always visit your local law enforcement office for this information. The police officer will charge you a nominal fee and provide you with a print-out of the individual's warrant record. It is not suggested to do this type of search on yourself. Obviously, the police officer will be forced to arrest you if they find that you have a Arizona AZ warrant against your record.

The Definition of a Warrant

The simplest way to define a warrant is: a court document that commands police to take a particular action. There are several different types of warrants, but the most common are arrest warrants and search warrants.
While arrest warrants command police to arrest individuals, search warrants command of the police to search specified locations. A warrant is a legal document, signed by a judge and administered by the police.

The Definition of an Arrest Warrant

Fortunately in the United States, Police Departments are not allowed to randomly arrest its citizens. First, a judge must sign a legal document called an arrest warrant before law enforcement can make an arrest. Arrest warrants can be issued for various reasons, but, failure to appear at court is the most common cause. Keep in mind that police officers will enter homes and places of business to incarcerate fugitives with arrest warrants on their record.

How to Find Out If You Have a Warrant in Tucson Arizona AZ :


Whether you're searching for a warrant on yourself or others, you have a few options to get the job done. The first option is to head down to your local police department and make a warrant request. The only problem with this option is that you usually need a good reason to do a search on someone else. If you convinced the officer that you have a good reason - obtaining a warrant report will cost a nominal fee, and a bit of patience. Keep in mind that this is a low priority request, and the police officer at the front desk will often take their time with your arrest warrant search.
A word of warning: this method is not suggested if you are doing an arrest warrant search on yourself. If the police determine that you have an active warrant, they will arrest you and you will not have a chance to prepare your defense. You also shouldn't use this method when checking on the status of family members or close friends as well. This is because the police will attempt to gather information about the person's whereabouts. You could even be brought into the situation if you attempt to deceive the police, as obstructing justice is a crime.

The easiest and safest way to check if someone has an outstanding warrant on file is by using a public online search engine, like govwarrantsearch.org. This site will allow you to instantly investigate anyone's background using all national databases and receive the information that you need without having to go anywhere in person. You can easily gather information from many databases with a single click, and either conduct an in-state search for warrants in Tucson Arizona AZ , or use the "Nationwide" option to search for warrants anywhere else in the entire United States. Aside from being quick and easy, an online search is also beneficial because of the privacy that it affords you. You can avoid putting your freedom in jeopardy by searching online. Using a public online search like govwarrantsearch.org is the recommended method for anyone that needs arrest warrant information.

Bench Warrants Defined

A bench warrant is placed against any individual that does not show up for a court date as scheduled. This warrant directs law enforcement to seek out this individual and place them into custody. As far as the police are concerned, an individual with a bench warrant is a fugitive at large.

If you have a bench warrant against you, it is important to take care of the situation as soon as possible. Usually, local law enforcement officers are very active when it comes to serving bench warrants. It is not uncommon for the police to arrive at your home at 2 AM to take you to jail.

Search Warrants Defined

A search warrant is a court order document that allows a particular law enforcement agency to search a home or place of business for proof of illegal activity. Search warrants are signed by a judge and very specific in nature. Law enforcement must adhere to the verbiage of the document or risk having their evidence inadmissible in court. Search warrants have a specific expiration date and the police cannot continue to return without a new search warrant.

If you are served with a search warrant, you should ask to read the warrant to ensure that the police are following the court order properly. It will detail the types of evidence that can be removed, when they are allowed to search, as well as the limitations on where law enforcement are allowed to search. While law enforcement officers are allowed to confiscate any contraband that they locate during the search (drugs, unregistered weapons, etc.), they can only remove evidence listed in the search warrant.

Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants Explained

Both active warrants and outstanding warrants have the same meaning and can be used equally in the eyes of the law. With that being said, the term, "outstanding warrant" is most often used to describe warrants that are several years old. Regardless of the chosen phrase, both outstanding warrants and active warrants are court-ordered documents that allow law enforcement to arrest an individual using any means necessary.

I Have Not Been Notified By The Police - Could I Still Have An Arrest Warrant On File?
You should never wait on notification from the police to determine if you have an arrest warrant on file. The sad truth is that the majority of individuals arrested were unaware of a warrant on their record. Silvia Conrad experienced this first hand when a police officer randomly appeared at her place of work. She was completely unaware of a warrant placed against her, but was hauled off to jail. While it may create an embarrassing experience, the police will do whatever it takes to apprehend you.

To understand why you may not be notified properly, you should look at it from the prospective of the police. It basically makes law enforcement's job much easier. The police would rather catch you off guard than prepared and ready to run. Bottom Line - Whether you have been notified or not, the police will find you and arrest you to serve their warrant.
How to Avoid Being Picked Up On An Arrest Warrant

Before you get your hopes up and think that you can actually live a normal life with an arrest warrant on your record, you must realize that this is an impossible venture. Even if you were capable of eluding the police for quite some time, your life would be anything but normal. The thought of a looming arrest would always be on your mind, and would force you to constantly `watch your back' for the police.

Unfortunately, the sad truth is that the majority of arrest warrants get served years after the warrant is issued. "Don't Run!" is probably the best advice that one can receive. Its much better to take care of the problem as soon as possible than wait until you've gotten your life back together and find that you're being drawn back into the same old situation..

Do Arrest Warrants Expire?

Regardless of the state that the warrant was filed, there is no expiration of an arrest warrant. These warrants will only go away in the case of:
a) Death
b) Appearance before the judge that ordered the warrant
c) Arrest
 


General Information from wikipedia: 
Tucson, Arizona Tucson (pronounced /ˈtuːsɒn/Too-sawn) is a city in and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States. The city is located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. The 2009 Census Bureau estimate puts the city's population at 548,555, with a metropolitan area population at 1,023,320 as of July 1, 2008. In 2005, Tucson ranked as the 32nd largest city and 52nd largest metropolitan area in the United States. It is the largest city in southern Arizona and the second largest in the state after Phoenix. Tucson is home to the University of Arizona.Major incorporated suburbs of Tucson include Oro Valley and Marana northwest of the city, Sahuarita south of the city, and South Tucson in an enclave south of downtown. Communities in the vicinity of Tucson (some within or overlapping the city limits) include Casas Adobes, Catalina, Catalina Foothills, Flowing Wells, Green Valley, Tanque Verde, New Pascua, Vail, and Benson.Tucson has four main mountain ranges, one to the north known as the Santa Catalina Mountains, to the east are the Rincon Mountains, south the Santa Rita Mountains will be found, and west are the Tucson Mountains. The highest point in the area is Mount Wrightson found in the Santa Rita Mountains at 9,453 feet above sea level, surpassing Mount Lemmon by about 300 feet.The English name Tucson derives from the Spanish name of the city, Tucsón [tukˈson], which was borrowed from the O'odham name Cuk Ṣon [tʃʊk ʂɔːn], meaning '(at the) base of the black [hill]', a reference to an adjacent volcanic mountain. Tucson is sometimes referred to as 'The Old Pueblo'. History Tucson was probably first visited by Paleo-Indians, known to have been in southern Arizona by about 12,000 years ago. Recent archaeological excavations near the Santa Cruz River have located a village site dating from 4,000 years ago. The floodplain of the Santa Cruz River was extensively farmed during the Early Agricultural period, circa 1200 BC to AD 150. These people constructed irrigation canals and grew corn, beans, and other crops while gathering wild plants and hunting animals. The Early Ceramic period occupation of Tucson saw the first extensive use of pottery vessels for cooking and storage. The groups designated by archaeologists as the Hohokam lived in the area from AD 600 to 1450 and are known for their vast irrigation canal systems as well as their red-on-brown pottery.Jesuit missionary Eusebio Francisco Kino visited the Santa Cruz River valley in 1692, and founded the Mission San Xavier del Bac in 1700 about 7 miles (12 km) upstream from the site of the settlement of Tucson. A separate Convento settlement was founded downstream along the then flowing Santa Cruz River, near the base of what is now 'A' mountain. The Spanish subsequently established a walled fortress, Presidio San Agustín del Tucsón, on August 20, 1775 (near the present downtown Pima County Courthouse). During the Spanish period of the presidio, attacks such as the Second Battle of Tucson were repeatedly mounted by Apaches. Eventually the town came to be called 'Tucson' and became a part of Mexico after Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821. Tucson was captured by the Mormon Battalion during the Mexican-American War. Following the Gadsden Purchase in 1853, Tucson became a part of the United States of America, although the American military did not formally take over control of the community until March 1856. In 1857 Tucson became a stage station on the San Antonio-San Diego Mail Line and in 1858 became 3rd division headquarters of the Butterfield Overland Mail until the line shut down in March 1861. The Overland Mail Corporation attempted to continue operations, however following the Bascom Affair, devasating Apache attacks on the stations and coaches ended operations in August 1861.From August 1861, until mid-1862, Tucson was the western capital of the Confederate Arizona Territory, the eastern capital being Mesilla. In 1862 the California Column drove the Confederate forces out of Arizona. Tucson and all of what is now Arizona was part of New Mexico Territory until 1863, when it became part of the new Arizona Territory. From 1867 to 1877, Tucson was the capital of Arizona Territory. Fort Lowell, then east of Tucson, was established to help protect settlers from Apache attacks. In 1882, Frank Stilwell was shot and killed by Wyatt Earp near Tucson's train station. This event helped trigger the Arizona War that lasted a few weeks.In 1885, the University of Arizona, was founded as a land-grant college on over-grazed ranch land between Tucson and Fort Lowell.By 1900, 7,531 people lived in the city. The population increased gradually to 13,913 in 1910. At about this time, the U.S. Veterans Administration had begun construction on the present Veterans Hospital. Many veterans who had been gassed in World War I and were in need of respiratory therapy began coming to Tucson after the war, due to the clean dry air. Over the following years the city continued to grow, with the population increasing to 20,292 in 1920 and 36,818 in 1940. In 2006 the population of Pima County, in which Tucson is located, passed one million while the City of Tucson's population was 535,000.During the territorial and early statehood periods, Tucson was Arizona's largest city and commercial center, while Phoenix was the seat of state government (beginning in 1889) and agriculture. The establishment of Tucson Municipal Airport increased its prominence. Between 1910 and 1920 Phoenix surpassed Tucson in population, and has continued to outpace Tucson in growth. In recent years, both Tucson and Phoenix have experienced among the highest growth rates in the United States. Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, Tucson has a total area of 195.1 square miles (505.3 km²), of which 194.7 square miles (504.2 km²) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.1 km²) (0.22%) is water.The city's elevation is 2,643 ft (728 m) above sea level (as measured at the Tucson International Airport). Tucson is situated on an alluvial plain in the Sonoran desert, surrounded by five minor ranges of mountains: the Santa Catalina Mountains and the Tortolita Mountains to the north, the Santa Rita Mountains to the south, the Rincon Mountains to the east, and the Tucson Mountains to the west. The high point of the Santa Catalina Mountains is 9,157-foot (2,791 m) Mount Lemmon, the southernmost ski destination in the continental U.S., while the Tucson Mountains include 4,687-foot (1,429 m) Wasson Peak. The highest point in the area is Mount Wrightson, found in the Santa Rita Mountains at 9,453 feet above sea level.The city is located on the Santa Cruz River, formerly a perennial river but now a dry river bed for much of the year that floods during significant seasonal rains.Interstate 10, which runs south and west of town, connects Tucson to Phoenix to the northwest on the way to its western terminus in Santa Monica, California, and to Las Cruces, New Mexico and El Paso, Texas toward its eastern terminus in Jacksonville, Florida. I-19 runs south from Tucson toward Nogales and the U.S.-Mexico border. I-19 is the only Interstate highway that uses 'kilometer posts' instead of 'mileposts', although the speed limits are marked in miles per hour instead of kilometers per hour. Cityscape Similar to many other cities in the Western U.S., Tucson was developed on a grid plan starting in the late 19th century, with the city center at Stone Avenue and Broadway Boulevard. While this intersection was initially near the geographic center of Tucson, that center has shifted as the city has expanded far to the east, development to the west being effectively blocked by the Tucson Mountains. An expansive city covering substantial area, Tucson has many distinct neighborhoods. Early neighborhoods Tucson's earliest neighborhoods, some of which are now covered by the Tucson Convention Center, or TCC, include:El Presidio,Tucson's oldest neighborhood Barrio Histórico,also known as Barrio Libre Armory Park, directly south of downtown Barrio Anita,named for an early settler and located between Granada Avenue andInterstate 10 Barrio Tiburón, now known as the Fourth Avenue arts district – designated in territorial times as ared-light district Barrio El Jardín, named for an early recreational site, Levin's Gardens Barrio El Hoyo, named for a lake that was part of the gardens. Before the TCC was built, El Hoyo (Spanish for pit or hole) referred to this part of the city, which was inhabited mainly by Mexican-American citizens and Mexican immigrants. Other historical neighborhoods near downtown include:Feldman's, named for an early resident photographer (with the streets 'Helen' and 'Mabel' named for his daughters) Menlo Park, situated west of downtown, adjacent to 'A Mountain' more correctly calledSentinel Peak Iron Horse, east of Fourth Avenue and north of the railroad tracks, named for its proximity West University, located between the University of Arizona and downtown Pie Allen, located west and south of the university nearTucson High Schooland named for a local entrepreneur and early mayor of Tucson Sam Hughes, located east of the University of Arizona and named after an instigator/hero of theCamp Grant Massacre Downtown At the end of the first decade of the 21st century, downtown Tucson is undergoing a revitalization effort by city planners and the business community. The primary project is Rio Nuevo, a large retail and community center that has been stalled in planning for more than ten years. Downtown is generally classified as north of 22nd Street, east of I-10, and southwest of Toole Avenue and the Union Pacific (formerly Southern Pacific) railroad tracks, site of the historic train depot and 'Locomotive #1673', built in 1900. Downtown is divided into the Presidio District, the Barrio Viejo, and the Congress Street Arts and Entertainment District.[citation needed]Tucson's tallest building, the 26-story UniSource Energy Tower is situated downtown and was completed in 1986. The planned Sheraton Convention Center Hotel would surpass the Bank Building at 25-28 stories. Other high-rise buildings downtown include Bank of America Plaza, and the Pioneer (completed in 1914).[citation needed]Attractions downtown include the Hotel Congress designed in 1919, the Art Deco Fox Theater designed in 1929, the Rialto Theatre opened in 1920, and St. Augustine Cathedral completed in 1896. Included on the National Register of Historic Places is the old Pima County Courthouse, designed by Roy W. Place in 1928. The El Charro Café, Tucson's oldest restaurant, also operates its main location downtown. Central or Midtown As one of the oldest parts of town, Central Tucson is anchored by the Broadway Village shopping center designed by local architect Josias Joesler at the intersection of Broadway Boulevard and Country Club Road. The 4th Avenue Shopping District between downtown and the University and the Lost Barrio just East of downtown also have many unique and popular stores. Local retail business in Central Tucson is densely concentrated along Fourth Avenue and the Main Gate Square on University Boulevard near the UA campus. The El Con Mall is also located in the eastern part of midtown.The University of Arizona, chartered in 1885, is located in midtown and includes Arizona Stadium and McKale Center. Historic Tucson High School (designed by Roy Place in 1924) featured in the 1987 film Can't Buy Me Love, the Arizona Inn (built in 1930), and the Tucson Botanic Gardens are also located in Central Tucson.Tucson's largest park, Reid Park is located in midtown and includes Reid Park Zoo and Hi Corbett Field. Speedway Boulevard, a major east-west arterial road in central Tucson, was named the 'ugliest street in America' by Life magazine in the early 1970s, quoting Tucson Mayor James Corbett. Despite this, Speedway Boulevard was awarded 'Street of the Year' by Arizona Highways in the late 1990s.Central Tucson is bicycle-friendly. To the east of the University of Arizona, Third Street is bike-only except for local traffic and passes by the historic homes of the Sam Hughes neighborhood. To the west, E. University Boulevard leads to the Fourth Avenue Shopping District. To the North, N. Mountain Avenue has a full bike-only lane for half of the 3.5 miles (5.6 km) to the Rillito River Park bike and walk multi-use path. To the south, N. Highland Avenue leads to the Barraza-Aviation Parkway bicycle path. South side and South Tucson South Tucson has a colorful, dynamic history. It was first incorporated in 1936, and later reincorporated in 1940. South Tucson is a square-mile community just South of downtown Tucson. The population consists of about 83% Mexican-American and 10% Native American. South Tucson is widely known for it's many Mexican restaurants and the architectural styles which including bright outdoor murals many of which have been painted over do to city policy. The South side is generally considered to be the area of approximately 25 square miles (65 square kilometers) north of Los Reales Road, south of 22nd Street, east of I-19, west of Davis Monthan Air Force Base and southwest of Aviation Parkway. Much of Tucson's Mexican-American population live on the south side. The Tucson International Airport and Tucson Electric Park are also located here.[citation needed] West Tucson West Tucson is a combination of urban and suburban development. Generally defined as the area west of I-10, West Tucson encompasses the banks of the Santa Cruz River and the foothills of the Tucson Mountains. Attractions in West Tucson include Saguaro National Park West, Sentinel Peak, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Old Tucson Studios, and the Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa.On Sentinel Peak (also known as ''A' Mountain'), just west of downtown, there is a giant 'A' in honor of the University of Arizona. Starting in about 1910, a yearly tradition developed for freshmen to whitewash the 'A', which was visible for miles. However, at the beginning of the Iraq War, anti-war activists painted it black. This was followed by a paint scuffle where the 'A' was painted various colors until the city council intervened. It is now red, white and blue except when it is white or another color decided by a biennial election. Because of the three-color paint scheme often used, the shape of the A can be vague and indistinguishable from the rest of the peak. The top of Sentinel Peak, which is accessible by road, offers an outstanding scenic view of the city looking eastward. A parking lot located near the summit of Sentinel Peak was formerly a popular place to watch sunsets or view the city lights at night. This is no longer possible as a recent ordinance has forced the closing of Sentinel Peak at 8 p.m. Every evening, Tucson police set up a barricade blocking the entrance while they enforce the evacuation of all visitors off the mountain.[citation needed] North Tucson North Tucson includes the urban neighborhoods of Amphitheater and Flowing Wells. Usually considered the area north of Fort Lowell Road, north Tucson includes some of Tucson's primary commercial zones (Tucson Mall and the Oracle Road Corridor). Many of the city's most upscale boutiques, restaurants, and art galleries are also located on the north side including St. Philip's Plaza. The Plaza is directly adjacent to the historic St. Philip's in the Hills Episcopal Church (built in 1936). Also on the north side is the suburban community of Catalina Foothills (formerly known as 'The Friendly Village of The Catalina's'), located in the foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains just north of the city limits. This community includes among the area's most expensive homes, sometimes multi-million dollar estates. The Foothills area is generally defined as north of River Road, east of Oracle Road, and west of Sabino Creek. Some of the Tucson area's major resorts are located in the Catalina Foothills, including the Hacienda Del Sol, Westin La Paloma Resort, Loews Ventana Canyon Resort and Canyon Ranch Resort. La Encantada, an upscale outdoor shopping mall, is also in the Foothills.The foothills area is home to Tohono Chul Park (a botanical garden) near the intersection of Oracle Road and Ina. Also the DeGrazia Gallery of the Sun near the intersection of Swan Road and Skyline Drive. Built by artist Ted DeGrazia starting in 1951, the 10-acre (40,000 m2) property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and features an eclectic chapel, an art gallery and a free museum. East Tucson East Tucson is relatively new compared to other parts of the city, developed between the 1950s and the 1970s, such as Desert Palms Park. It is generally classified as the area of the city east of Swan Road, with above-average real estate values relative to the rest of the city. The area includes urban and suburban development near the Rincon Mountains. East Tucson includes Saguaro National Park East. Tucson's 'Restaurant Row' is also located on the east side, along with a significant corporate and financial presence. Tucson's largest office building is 5151 East Broadway in east Tucson, completed in 1975. Park Place, a recently renovated shopping center, is also located there.Near the intersection of Craycroft and Ft. Lowell Road are the remnants of the Historic Fort Lowell. This area has become one of Tucson's iconic neighborhoods. The Fort abandoned at the end of the 19th century was rediscovered by a trio of artists in the 1930s. The Bolsius family Pete, Nan and Charles Bolsius purchased and renovated surviving adobe buildings of the Fort - transforming them into spectacular artistic southwestern architectural examples. Their woodwork, plaster treatment and sense of proportion drew on their Dutch heritage and New Mexican experience. Other artists and academics throughout the middle of the 20th century, including: Win Ellis, Jack Maul, Madame Cheruy, Giorgio Belloli, Charels Bode, Veronica Hughart, Edward and Rosamond Spicer, and Ruth Brown, renovated adobes, built homes and lived in the area. This rural pocket in the middle of the city is listed on the National register of Historic Places. Each year in February the neighborhood celebrates its history in the City Landmark it owns and restored the San Pedro Chapel.Situated between the Santa Catalina Mountains and the Rincon Mountains near Redington Pass northeast of the city limits is the community of Tanque Verde. The Arizona National Golf Club, Forty-Niners Country Club, and the historic Tanque Verde Guest Ranch are also in northeast Tucson. Southeast Tucson Southeast Tucson continues to experience rapid residential development. The area includes Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The area is considered to be south of Golf Links Road. The suburban community of Rita Ranch houses many of the military families from Davis-Monthan. It is the home of Santa Rita High School, Chuck Ford Park (Lakeside Park), Lakeside Lake, Lincoln Park (upper and lower), The Lakecrest Neighborhoods, and Pima Community College East Campus. The Atterbury Wash with its access to excellent bird watching is also located in the Southeast Tucson area. Northwest Tucson The expansive area northwest of the city limits is diverse, ranging from the rural communities of Catalina and parts of the town of Marana, to the affluent town of Oro Valley in the western foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains, and residential areas in the northeastern foothills of the Tucson Mountains. The community of Casas Adobes is also on the Northwest Side, with the distinction of being Tucson's first suburb, established in the late 1940s. Casas Adobes is centered on the historic Casas Adobes Plaza (built in 1948). The Foothills Mall is also located on the northwest side. Continental Ranch (Marana), Dove Mountain (Marana), and Rancho Vistoso (Oro Valley) are all masterplanned communities located in the Northwest, where thousands of residents live.Many of the Tucson area's golf courses and resorts are located in this area, including the Hilton El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort in Oro Valley, the Omni Tucson National Resort & Spa, and Westward Look Resort. The Ritz Carlton at Dove Mountain, the second Ritz Carlton Resort in Arizona, which also includes a golf course, opened in the foothills of the Tortolita Mountains in northeast Marana in 2009. Catalina State Park and Tortolita Mountain Park are also located in the Northwest area. Mount Lemmon Mount Lemmon, the highest peak of the Santa Catalina Mountains, reaches an elevation of 9,157 feet above sea level. The mountain is named after 19th Century botanist Sara Lemmon. She was the first documented European to ascend to the peak and was purportedly guided by local Tohono O'odham up through Babad Do'ag (the O'odham name for the Santa Catalina Mountains). Lemmon botanized extensively along the way, including collecting the plant Tagetes lemmoni which is now called the Mount Lemmon marigold.Near the top of Mt. Lemmon is the town of Summerhaven. This is one of Tucson's biggest vacation spots. While it can be hiked, most people use Catalina Highway, which stretches 25 miles. In Summerhaven, visitors will find log houses, shops, and a rather large gift shop. Also, there is another road that leads to Mount Lemmon, where one will find a ski area.Mt. Lemmon Sky Center, which is located at a Steward Observatory site known as 'Sky Island', sits 9,152 feet in altitude on the summit of Mt. Lemmon. As one of the Southwestern United States's 27 unique Sky Islands, this science learning facility is open to the public.. Climate and environmental issues Tucson has hot summers and temperate winters. However, Tucson is almost always cooler and wetter than Phoenix because of its higher elevation.Tucson has a desert climate (Köppen Bwh), with two major seasons, summer and winter; plus three minor seasons: fall, spring, and the monsoon. Though Tucson receives more precipitation than most other locations with desert climates, it still qualifies due to its high evapotranspiration in spite of receiving 11.8 inches (299.7 mm) of precipitation per year; in other words, it experiences a high net loss of water. A similar scenario is seen in Alice Springs, Australia which averages 11 inches (279.4 mm) a year, but has a desert climate.The most obvious difference of climate from most other inhabited regions is the extremely hot and sunny climate. This difference is a major contributing factor to a rate of skin cancer that is at least 3 times higher than in more northerly regions. Media reports heat related deaths increasing among illegal immigrants in and around Tucson. Heatstroke related deaths have been recorded since 1999 in the Pima County Area.Summer is characterized by daytime temperatures that exceed 100 °F (37 °C) and overnight temperatures between 66 °F (19 °C) and 85 °F (29 °C). Early summer is characterized by low humidity and clear skies; mid-summer and late summer are characterized by higher humidity, cloudy skies and frequent rain.The monsoon can begin any time from mid-June to late July, with an average start date around July 3. It typically continues through August and sometimes into September. During the monsoon, the humidity is much higher than the rest of the year. It begins with clouds building up from the south in the early afternoon followed by intense thunderstorms and rainfall, which can cause flash floods. The evening sky at this time of year is often pierced with dramatic lightning strikes. Large areas of the city do not have storm sewers, so monsoon rains flood the main thoroughfares, usually for no longer than a few hours. A few underpasses in Tucson have 'feet of water' scales painted on their supports to discourage fording by automobiles during a rainstorm. Arizona traffic code Title 28-910, the so-called 'Stupid Motorist Law', was instituted in 1995 to discourage people from entering flooded roadways. If the road is flooded and a barricade is in place, motorists who drive around the barricade can be charged up to $2000 for costs involved in rescuing them. Despite all warnings and precautions, however, three Tucson drivers have drowned between 2004 and 2010.The weather in the fall is much like that during spring: dry, with cool nights and warm to hot days. Temperatures above 100 degrees occur into early October. Average daytime highs of 84 °F (28 °C), with overnight lows of 55 °F (13 °C), are typical in the fall, with mean daily temperatures falling more rapidly from October to December.Winters in Tucson are mild relative to other parts of the United States. Daytime highs in the winter range between 64 °F (18 °C) and 75 °F (24 °C), with overnight lows between 30 °F (−1 °C) and 44 °F (7 °C). Although rare, snow has been known to fall in Tucson, usually a light dusting that melts within a day.Early spring is characterized by gradually rising temperatures and several weeks of vivid wildflower blooms beginning in late February and into March. Daytime average highs range from 72 °F (23 °C) in March to 88 °F (31 °C) in May with average overnight lows in March of 45 °F (7 °C) and in May of 59 °F (15 °C).At the University of Arizona, where records have been kept since 1894, the record maximum temperature was 115 °F (46 °C) on June 19, 1960, and July 28, 1995, and the record minimum temperature was 6 °F (−14 °C) on January 7, 1913. There are an average of 150.1 days annually with highs of 90°F (32°C) or higher and an average of 26.4 days with lows of 32°F (0°C) or lower. Average annual precipitation is 11.15 in (283 mm) . There is an average of 49 days with measurable precipitation. The wettest year was 1905 with 24.17 in (614 mm) and the driest year was 1924 with 5.07 in (129 mm). The most precipitation in one month was 7.56 in (192 mm) in July 1984. The most precipitation in 24 hours was 4.16 in (106 mm) on October 1, 1983. Annual snowfall averages 0.7 in (1.8 cm). The most snow in one year was 7.2 in (18 cm) in 1987. The most snow in one month was 6.00 in (15.2 cm) in January 1898 and March 1922.At the airport, where records have been kept since 1930, the record maximum temperature was 117 °F (47 °C) on June 26, 1990, and the record minimum temperature was 16 °F (−9 °C) on January 4, 1949. There is an average of 145.0 days annually with highs of 90°F (32°C) or higher and an average of 16.9 days with lows of 32°F (0°C) or lower. Average annual precipitation is 11.59 inches. Measurable precipitation falls on an average of 53 days. The wettest year was 1983 with 21.86 inches of precipitation, and the driest year was 1953 with 5.34 inches. The most rainfall in one month was 7.93 inches in August 1955. The most rainfall in 24 hours was 3.93 inches on July 29, 1958. Snow at the airport averages only 1.1 inch annually. The most snow received in one year was 8.3 inches and the most snow in one month was 6.8 inches in December 1971. Environmental sustainability Tucson is considered to be in a natural location for the development of a solar energy community, but the city has not yet adopted solar power in any significant way. Perhaps the biggest sustainability problem is potable water supply. Household water use is the principal drain on the water supply, with agriculture a close second. In 1997, the 35 golf courses in the area consumed about 10 percent of the municipal water supply, and since then, 16 of the remaining 25 or so courses use reclaimed water. (These figures for golf course consumption are based on water consumption through Tucson Water. Many golf courses also have their own wells and do not state their consumption from well usage. To put golf course water usage into context, the average water usage of a single golf course, nationwide, is that of approximately 50,000 residents.) As a result[clarification needed], industry and residences consume the vast majority of municipal water. Like golf courses, agricultural lands are turning toward reclaimed water. Mining and other industrial water uses combined accounted for about a 15 percent of water use in 1997. Although Tucsonans find lawns less acceptable than their neighbors in Phoenix,[citation needed] massive drawing down of groundwater resources over the last 100 years has occurred, visible as ground subsidence in some residential areas.To prevent further loss of groundwater, Tucson has been at the forefront[citation needed] of water conservation and groundwater preservation effort, shifting away from its reliance on a series of Tucson area wells in favor of conservation, consumption-based pricing for residential and commercial water use, and new wells in the more sustainable Avra Valley aquifer, northwest of the city. An allocation from the Central Arizona Project Aqueduct, which passes more than 300 miles (480 km) across the desert from the Colorado River, has been incorporated into the city's water supply, providing up to 56 billion gallons of 'recharged' water, pumped into the ground to replenish water pumped out. Although some critics have cast doubt over the system's long-term sustainability, a 2004 report by the University of Arizona's Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) projected sufficient sustainable supply for twice the current population, assuming continued efforts at conservation, re-use and use of rainfall. Water More than 100 years ago, the Santa Cruz River flowed nearly year-round through Tucson. This supply of water has slowly disappeared, causing Tucson to seek alternative sources.From 1803 until 1887, Tucson residents purchased water for a penny a gallon from vendors who transported it in bags draped over burros' backs. After that, water was sold by the bucket or barrel and delivered door-to-door in wagons.[citation needed]In 1881, water was pumped from a well on the banks of the Santa Cruz River and flowed by gravity through pipes into the distribution system.Tucson currently draws water from two main sources: Central Arizona Project (CAP) water and groundwater. In 1992, Tucson Water delivered CAP water to some customers that was referred to as being unacceptable due to discoloration, bad odor and flavor, as well as problems it caused some customers' plumbing and appliances. Tucson's city water currently consists of CAP water mixed with groundwater.In an effort to conserve water, Tucson is recharging groundwater supplies by running part of its share of CAP water into various open portions of local rivers to seep into their aquifer. Additional study is scheduled to determine the amount of water that is lost through evaporation from the open areas, especially during the summer. Demographics According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of Tucson was as follows:White: 68.8% (Non-Hispanic Whites: 49.8%) Black or African American: 4.4% Native American: 2.8% Asian: 2.7% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2% Some other race: 17.8% Two or more races: 3.4% Hispanic or Latino(of any race): 39.5%;Mexican Americansmade up 36.1% of the city's population. Source:As of the census of 2000, there were 486,699 people, 192,891 households, and 112,455 families residing in the city. The population density was 965.3/km² (2,500.1/sq mi). There were 209,609 housing units at an average density of 415.7/km² (1,076.7/sq mi). The racial makeup of the city was 70.2% White, 4.3% Black or African-American, 2.3% Native American, 2.5% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 16.9% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 35.7% of the population.There were 192,891 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.7% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.7% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individua
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