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Clark County Indiana Warrant Search

In order to search for active arrest warrants in Clark County Indiana , you can either physically go to your local police department, pay a small fee and get the report you need (not the best choice of you need to check your own name) or you can use our advanced online warrant record databases to instantly and discreetly check millions of records with a single click. Use the search form above to either check your local jurisdiction, or better yet - run an Out-of-State (Nationwide) arrest warrant search, to search for warrant & arrest records found in other jurisdictions - about the individual.
GovWarrantSearch.org, is a recognized and trusted online records information provider, that lets you utilize a network of multiple data sources, to discreetly search thousands of court orders, criminal files and more than 1.2 billion records - with a single click, and receive the facts about people you wish to investigate (including yourself) without leaving the comfort of your home or office. Statistics show that many people that have a "clean" criminal history record, showing no convictions or former arrests in a background check, are in fact outlaws that avoided trial and have active warrants out for their arrest. Our comprehensive criminal records check is a detailed report showing warrants and other records that you would not be able to obtain through many regular online public records providers. GovWarrtantSearch.org lets you access the same resources used by the police, licensed PI's and bounty hunters seeking information on whereabouts of criminals with warrants or others that avoided trial. All the details you could possibly need about the subject are provided to you in one criminal report. Avoid the need to personally visit dozens of courthouses to get these records. Simply fill out the form above and within less than 30 seconds you're search will be over, and facts will show on your screen.

The Definition of a Warrant

Law enforcement agents can't just randomly arrest or search individuals that they believe to be involved in a crime. In order to prevent police officers from trampling on the rights of citizens, there is a due process that must be followed, and a warrant is one of these processes. A warrant is simply a signed document from a judge, allowing police to take an action. Depending upon the type of warrant, that action can be the arrest of a named individual or the search of a residence. Judges can sign off on three major types of warrants: Search Warrants, Bench Warrants, and Arrest Warrants. Each one is different depending upon the situation.

What is an Arrest Warrant?

An arrest warrant is a legal document that is signed by a judge and enables law enforcement to make an immediate arrest of an individual. These are often issued when a crime has been committed and the police have a particular suspect that they would like to apprehend. Arrest warrants give police enforcement the right to even enter homes to apprehend a suspect if necessary.

How Do You Find Out If Someone Has An Arrest Warrant Against Them?

Some law enforcement agents will notify suspects of an arrest warrant via a letter at the last known address or through a phone call. While others swoop down and make an immediate arrest. At a nominal cost, the local police department will provide you with arrest information for an individual. However, you should never check your own record in this manner because you will be immediately arrested if there are active warrants on your record. The easiest approach is to make use of an online public records service that will provide you with all of the information in one easy to read format.

What is a Bench Warrant?

It's extremely important to attend any court appearances that you are scheduled for. If you do not appear in court, a judge will hold you in contempt of court and sign a bench warrant with your name on it. From this point on, you will instantly be considered a fugitive from justice in the eyes of the law. This court order will allow the police to arrest you on sight and even enter your home in order to apprehend you. It's important to remember that there is no statute of limitations for a bench warrant. This type of warrant never expires and will only be cleared upon your death or arrest.

What is a Search Warrant?

If the police believe that a crime has been committed or is being committed in a particular area, they will request a search warrant from a judge. This document will enable them to perform a complete search on the area listed on the warrant. They can be given full rights to walk into your home to gather evidence, and you are not able to stop them. An example of this can be seen when the police use warrants to seize narcotics or weapons from a home. It's important to keep in mind that a search warrant is extremely specific, and will often label the exact location, the specific evidence, and time of search. Police officers cannot continuously return to your home to gather more evidence unless another search warrant is obtained. If law enforcement officers violate any of the conditions of the warrant, they will not be allowed to present the evidence in court.

What are Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants?

Outstanding warrants and active warrants are synonymous and used interchangeably in the court system. Active warrants are placed against an individual when they have either been suspected of committing a crime (arrest warrant) or if they did not appear for a court date (bench warrant). An active or outstanding warrant gives the police the right to immediately arrest the individual on sight, using all necessary means. The term outstanding warrant is generally used when describing an older warrant from a fugitive that has been avoiding police arrest for quite some time. Do not confuse this term, and believe that it means `expired warrant', because arrest warrants never expire.

Searching For Arrest Warrants in Clark County Indiana

When doing a search for active arrest warrants, there are a few methods that can be used. You can go down to the local police department and obtain a records search by providing the officer with pertinent information and paying a small fee for the results. However, you are advised against using this method if you are checking up on yourself or a friend. If you are doing a personal search on yourself and an arrest warrant appears on record, you will be arrested immediately. If it is for a friend, you will be subjected to questioning and possibly risk your friend's freedom or even worse endanger your own freedom for aiding a fugitive from justice. The most common method to search for arrest warrants is through a public online service like GovWarrantSearch.org. One major benefit of this type of online service is that you are able to gather information about yourself or anyone else in the privacy of your own home. In addition, a good online warrant search site will provide you with more information because you can either specifically search for warrants in Clark County Indiana, or you can perform either statewide or even a nationwide search to review an individual's complete record. This saves you numerous trips to multiple police departments. You should also keep in mind that a visit to the local police department will only show you results from that local area and you could be missing information from other jurisdictions.

Is It Possible To Have An Arrest Warrant On File And Not Know About It?

Probably one of the biggest misconceptions of arrest warrants is that the police will notify you and allow you to surrender yourself with an attorney. Sure, this happens sometimes, but law enforcement agents aren't required to make proper notification in advance of incarceration. Most people are informed of the warrant at the time of their arrest. Depending on the crime and workload of the police department, officers may arrive at your place of work, home, or the home's of family and friends to attempt to serve their warrant and make an arrest.

How Can I Avoid Being Apprehended With An Arrest Warrant On File?

Avoiding arrest with an arrest warrant on file would certainly prove to be a difficult life, and not recommended. The police can make an arrest at your home or work, so you will always be looking over your shoulder. Police records show that the majority of individuals with an arrest warrant against them are arrested on a minor traffic stop. An arrest warrant never goes away, and the police will eventually catch up with you.

When Does A Warrant Expire?

The only type of warrant that has an expiration date is a search warrant. Arrest warrants and bench warrants will only expire upon the death of the convict or a court appearance (usually due to an arrest). These types of warrants do not have any statute of limitations and have no expiration date.


General Information from wikipedia: 
Clark County, Indiana Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana, located directly across the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky. At the 2000 Census, the population was 96,472. As of 2007, the county's population was estimated at 105,035. The county seat is Jeffersonville. Clarksville is also a major city in the county.Clark County is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. History Clark County lies on the north bank of the Ohio River. A significant gateway to the state of Indiana, Clark County’s settlement began in 1783. The state of Virginia rewarded General George Rogers Clark and his regiment for their victorious capture of Forts Kaskaskia, Cahokia, and Vincennes from the British by granting them 150,000 acres (610 km2) of land. A small portion of this land, 1,000 acres (4.0 km2), became known as Clarksville, the first authorized American settlement in Northwest Territory, founded the next year in 1784.Clark County was formed 3 February 1801 from Knox County. Counties later formed all or in part from Clark County were: Crawford (1818), Decatur (1822), Fayette (1819), Floyd (1819), Franklin (1811), Harrison (1808), Jackson (1816), Jefferson (1811), Jennings (1817), Randolph (1818), Ripley (1816), Rush (1822), Scott (1820), Switzerland (1814), Union (1821), Washington (1814), and Wayne (1811).The first county seat and court was established in Springville, Indiana on April 7, 1801. The platting of Jeffersonville occurred a year later and the county seat was fixed to Jeffersonville on June 9, 1802 by order of Governor William Henry Harrison. By December 14, 1810 the county seat changed for the third time to Charlestown and it would remain there until 1873. The county seat changed for one last time on September 23, 1873 and returned to Jeffersonville with then mayor Luther Warder campaigning for the county seats return.From its beginning Clark County’s history, culture and growth has been linked to the development of the river. The use of the steamboat in the early nineteenth century to transport goods and services provided Clark County opportunities for commercial and industrial growth. In 1832, James Howard founded the Howard shipyards making Clark County a leader in ship building and bringing with it economic growth.The railroad brought further economic growth. Two railroad lines, the Monon, which spanned from New Albany to Chicago and the Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis railroad, provided Clark County and southern Indiana with access to the northern trading centers of Indianapolis and Chicago.Industries locating to Clark County during the nineteenth century included the Louisville Cement Company in Speed, Indiana and the Ford Plate Glass Company established in Jeffersonville in 1876.During the 1920s, Clark County attracted the Colgate-Palmolive Company to the Clarksville Riverfront. Colgate purchased the former Indiana Reformatory building in 1923. The Company rehabilitated and adapted the building for its dedication in 1924. They stayed in business until early 2008.Throughout the years of the Second World War, Clark County prospered. The United States began construction on the Indiana Arsenal near Charlestown in 1940. Producing smokeless powder for the conflict overseas, the arsenal, at times, employed as many as 20,000. During the war, Howard shipyards was Commissioned by the Navy to produce landing craft. Later Howard shipyards reorganized as Jeffersonville Boat and Machine Company (Jeffboat) — a current major employer (1991).After World War II ended, Clark County as well as the United States experienced significant residential and commercial growth. The Interstate Highway System act of 1956 aided this growth. Because of the improved access and efficiency brought by the interstate system, especially Interstate 65, new development in the form of subdivisions and shopping centers located near these roads.Mindful of its rich past, Clark County progresses toward the future boasting a diversified economic base and excellent development opportunities.Clark County history has been closely associated with the development of the Ohio River. From its beginnings, Clark County relied on the river for economic opportunities. Clark County has diversified its economic base, lessened its dependency on the river, and continues to develop in new directions. However, the county still looks to the river as one link to its significant pioneer heritage. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 376 square miles (973.8 km2). 375 square miles (971.2 km2) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km2) (0.31%) is water. Adjacent counties Scott County- north Jefferson County- northeast Trimble County, Kentucky- east Oldham County, Kentucky- southeast Jefferson County, Kentucky- south Floyd County- west Washington County- northwest Cities and towns Borden Charlestown Clarksville Jeffersonville Sellersburg Utica Unincorporated towns Bethlehem Henryville Marysville Memphis Nabb New Washington Oak Park Otisco Speed Starlight Watson Extinct towns Oregon Port Fulton Springville Townships Bethlehem Carr Charlestown Jeffersonville Monroe Oregon Owen Silver Creek Union Utica Washington Wood Major highways Interstate 65 U.S. Route 31 Indiana State Road 3 Indiana State Road 60 Indiana State Road 62 Indiana State Road 111 Indiana State Road 160 Indiana State Road 265 Indiana State Road 311 20pxIndiana State Road 362 Indiana State Road 403 Government The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.County Council: The seven member county council is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. Four representatives are elected from county districts, and three are elected at large. The council members serve four year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.Courts: The Clark County Judicial System consists of 8 Courts:Clark Circuit Court (Judge Daniel Moore) Clark Superior Court #1 (Judge Vicki Carmichael) Clark Superior Court #2 (Judge Jerome Jacobi) Clark Superior Court #3 (Judge Joe P. Weber) Jeffersonville City Court (Judge Ken Pierce) Charlestown City Court (Judge George Waters) Clarksville Town Court (Judge Samuel Gwin) Sellersburg Town Court (Judge Thomas Lowe)By statute, the Circuit and Superior Courts have unlimited jurisdiction with the power to hear all civil and criminal cases. City and Town Courts have jurisdiction to hear Ordinance violations and misdemeanor prosecutions, as well as civil actions where the amount in controversy does not exceed five hundred dollars ($500). Judgments in the City and Town Courts may be appealed de novo to the Clark Circuit Court. In addition, Clark Superior Court #3 maintains a Small Claims Docket. Local Rules of Practice may also limit the ability of a Court to hear certain cases. Judgments in other Courts may be appealed to the Indiana Court of appeals or the Indiana Supreme Court.The Circuit and Superior Court Judges are assisted by 2 Magistrates, who are appointed and serve at the direction of the elected Judges.The Circuit and Superior Court Judges are elected on a partisan basis, must reside within the County, and serve six year terms. The City and Town Court Judges are elected on a partisan basis, must reside within the City/Town, and serve four year terms.Felony and Misdemeanor prosecutions are filed by the Prosecuting Attorney, who is elected on a partisan basis, must reside within the County, and serves a term of four years. The current Prosecuting Attorney, Steven D. Stewart, has been in Office since 1989. County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including prosecuting attorney, sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk. Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare a party affiliation and to be residents of the county. Elected county officials The Clark County building is located on Court Avenue in downtown Jeffersonville, and has a council of 7 elected officials. The Clark County Council includes:Barbara C. Hollis Jackie Dickman Jack Coffman (Vice President) David Abbott (President) Chuck Moore R Monty Snelling Danny Yost Scott Lewis (Attorney) Clark County is part of Indiana's 9th congressional district and is represented in Congress by Democrat Baron Hill. Schools There are three separate public school districts and the Archdiocese of Indianapolis that serve the entirety of Clark County. The county is also served by two colleges that offer associates to bachelors degrees. Private Schools Our Lady of Providence Junior-Senior High School St. Anthony of Padua Elementary School(K-7) Sacred Heart of Jesus (PK-8) St. Paul's School(K-6) Colleges/ Universities Ivy Tech State College (Non-profit) Mid-America College of Funeral Services (Non-profit) Ottawa University - Jeffersonville (Non-Profit) Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 96,472 people, 38,751 households, and 26,544 families residing in the county. The population density was 257 people per square mile (99/km²). There were 41,176 housing units at an average density of 110 per square mile (42/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.30% White, 6.63% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.59% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.79% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. 1.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.7% were of German, 23.3% American, 11.9% Irish and 10.1% English ancestry according to Census 2000.There were 38,751 households out of which 31.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.10% were married couples living together, 12.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.50% were non-families. 26.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.95.In the county the population was spread out with 24.20% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 12.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.The median income for a household in the county was $40,111, and the median income for a family was $47,412. Males had a median income of $32,197 versus $24,033 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,936. About 6.00% of families and 8.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.20% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.
source: http://en.wikipedia.org: 
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