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Philadelphia County Pennsylvania Warrant Search

In order to search for active arrest warrants in Philadelphia County Pennsylvania , you can either physically go to your local police department, pay a small fee and get the report you need (not the best choice of you need to check your own name) or you can use our advanced online warrant record databases to instantly and discreetly check millions of records with a single click. Use the search form above to either check your local jurisdiction, or better yet - run an Out-of-State (Nationwide) arrest warrant search, to search for warrant & arrest records found in other jurisdictions - about the individual.
GovWarrantSearch.org, is a recognized and trusted online records information provider, that lets you utilize a network of multiple data sources, to discreetly search thousands of court orders, criminal files and more than 1.2 billion records - with a single click, and receive the facts about people you wish to investigate (including yourself) without leaving the comfort of your home or office. Statistics show that many people that have a "clean" criminal history record, showing no convictions or former arrests in a background check, are in fact outlaws that avoided trial and have active warrants out for their arrest. Our comprehensive criminal records check is a detailed report showing warrants and other records that you would not be able to obtain through many regular online public records providers. GovWarrtantSearch.org lets you access the same resources used by the police, licensed PI's and bounty hunters seeking information on whereabouts of criminals with warrants or others that avoided trial. All the details you could possibly need about the subject are provided to you in one criminal report. Avoid the need to personally visit dozens of courthouses to get these records. Simply fill out the form above and within less than 30 seconds you're search will be over, and facts will show on your screen.

The Definition of a Warrant

Law enforcement agents can't just randomly arrest or search individuals that they believe to be involved in a crime. In order to prevent police officers from trampling on the rights of citizens, there is a due process that must be followed, and a warrant is one of these processes. A warrant is simply a signed document from a judge, allowing police to take an action. Depending upon the type of warrant, that action can be the arrest of a named individual or the search of a residence. Judges can sign off on three major types of warrants: Search Warrants, Bench Warrants, and Arrest Warrants. Each one is different depending upon the situation.

What is an Arrest Warrant?

An arrest warrant is a legal document that is signed by a judge and enables law enforcement to make an immediate arrest of an individual. These are often issued when a crime has been committed and the police have a particular suspect that they would like to apprehend. Arrest warrants give police enforcement the right to even enter homes to apprehend a suspect if necessary.

How Do You Find Out If Someone Has An Arrest Warrant Against Them?

Some law enforcement agents will notify suspects of an arrest warrant via a letter at the last known address or through a phone call. While others swoop down and make an immediate arrest. At a nominal cost, the local police department will provide you with arrest information for an individual. However, you should never check your own record in this manner because you will be immediately arrested if there are active warrants on your record. The easiest approach is to make use of an online public records service that will provide you with all of the information in one easy to read format.

What is a Bench Warrant?

It's extremely important to attend any court appearances that you are scheduled for. If you do not appear in court, a judge will hold you in contempt of court and sign a bench warrant with your name on it. From this point on, you will instantly be considered a fugitive from justice in the eyes of the law. This court order will allow the police to arrest you on sight and even enter your home in order to apprehend you. It's important to remember that there is no statute of limitations for a bench warrant. This type of warrant never expires and will only be cleared upon your death or arrest.

What is a Search Warrant?

If the police believe that a crime has been committed or is being committed in a particular area, they will request a search warrant from a judge. This document will enable them to perform a complete search on the area listed on the warrant. They can be given full rights to walk into your home to gather evidence, and you are not able to stop them. An example of this can be seen when the police use warrants to seize narcotics or weapons from a home. It's important to keep in mind that a search warrant is extremely specific, and will often label the exact location, the specific evidence, and time of search. Police officers cannot continuously return to your home to gather more evidence unless another search warrant is obtained. If law enforcement officers violate any of the conditions of the warrant, they will not be allowed to present the evidence in court.

What are Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants?

Outstanding warrants and active warrants are synonymous and used interchangeably in the court system. Active warrants are placed against an individual when they have either been suspected of committing a crime (arrest warrant) or if they did not appear for a court date (bench warrant). An active or outstanding warrant gives the police the right to immediately arrest the individual on sight, using all necessary means. The term outstanding warrant is generally used when describing an older warrant from a fugitive that has been avoiding police arrest for quite some time. Do not confuse this term, and believe that it means `expired warrant', because arrest warrants never expire.

Searching For Arrest Warrants in Philadelphia County Pennsylvania

When doing a search for active arrest warrants, there are a few methods that can be used. You can go down to the local police department and obtain a records search by providing the officer with pertinent information and paying a small fee for the results. However, you are advised against using this method if you are checking up on yourself or a friend. If you are doing a personal search on yourself and an arrest warrant appears on record, you will be arrested immediately. If it is for a friend, you will be subjected to questioning and possibly risk your friend's freedom or even worse endanger your own freedom for aiding a fugitive from justice. The most common method to search for arrest warrants is through a public online service like GovWarrantSearch.org. One major benefit of this type of online service is that you are able to gather information about yourself or anyone else in the privacy of your own home. In addition, a good online warrant search site will provide you with more information because you can either specifically search for warrants in Philadelphia County Pennsylvania, or you can perform either statewide or even a nationwide search to review an individual's complete record. This saves you numerous trips to multiple police departments. You should also keep in mind that a visit to the local police department will only show you results from that local area and you could be missing information from other jurisdictions.

Is It Possible To Have An Arrest Warrant On File And Not Know About It?

Probably one of the biggest misconceptions of arrest warrants is that the police will notify you and allow you to surrender yourself with an attorney. Sure, this happens sometimes, but law enforcement agents aren't required to make proper notification in advance of incarceration. Most people are informed of the warrant at the time of their arrest. Depending on the crime and workload of the police department, officers may arrive at your place of work, home, or the home's of family and friends to attempt to serve their warrant and make an arrest.

How Can I Avoid Being Apprehended With An Arrest Warrant On File?

Avoiding arrest with an arrest warrant on file would certainly prove to be a difficult life, and not recommended. The police can make an arrest at your home or work, so you will always be looking over your shoulder. Police records show that the majority of individuals with an arrest warrant against them are arrested on a minor traffic stop. An arrest warrant never goes away, and the police will eventually catch up with you.

When Does A Warrant Expire?

The only type of warrant that has an expiration date is a search warrant. Arrest warrants and bench warrants will only expire upon the death of the convict or a court appearance (usually due to an arrest). These types of warrants do not have any statute of limitations and have no expiration date.


General Information from wikipedia: 
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania Philadelphia County is a county located in the U.S. State of Pennsylvania. It is coterminous with the city of Philadelphia which also serves as its seat. In 2009, the United States Census Bureau estimated the population had grown to 1,547,901, making it the most populous county in the state. Philadelphia County is one of the three original counties, along with Chester and Bucks counties, created by William Penn in November 1682.This county is part of the Delaware Valley area and is one of the flagships of the Greater Philadelphia MSA. Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 142.6 square miles (369.4 km²), of which 135.1 square miles (349.9 km²) is land and 7.6 square miles (19.6 km²) is water. The total area is 5.29% water. Bodies of water include the Delaware River, Schuylkill River, Cobbs Creek, Wissahickon Creek, and Pennypack Creek.The lowest point in the county lies 10 feet above sea level near Fort Mifflin in Southwest Philadelphia at the convergence of the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers. The highest point is in Chestnut Hill, at 432 feet above sea level, near Evergreen Place, just north and west of Evergreen Avenue. Adjacent counties Montgomery County, Pennsylvania(north) Bucks County, Pennsylvania(northeast) Burlington County, New Jersey(east) Camden County, New Jersey(southeast) Gloucester County, New Jersey(south) Delaware County, Pennsylvania(southwest) History Tribes of Lenape were the first known occupants in the area which became Philadelphia County. The first European settlers were Swedes and Finns who arrived in 1638. The Netherlands seized the area in 1655, but permanently lost control to England in 1674. William Penn received his charter for Pennsylvania from Charles II of England in 1681, and in November 1682 divided Pennsylvania into three counties. In the same year Philadelphia was laid out and was made the county seat and the capital of the Province of Pennsylvania.Penn wanted Philadelphia, meaning 'brotherly love', to be a place where religious tolerance and the freedom to worship were ensured. Philadelphia's name is shared with the ancient Asia Minor city spared in the Book of Revelation in the Quaker Bible. It was William Penn's prayer that his 'Holy Experiment' would be found blameless at the Last Judgment.When established, Philadelphia County consisted mainly of the area from the Delaware River west between the Schuylkill River to the south and the border with Bucks County to the north, the western boundary was undefined. Two counties would be formed out of Philadelphia County, Berks County which was formed in 1752 (from parts of Chester, Lancaster, and Philadelphia counties), and Montgomery County established in 1784. From these separations, as well as other border moves, come the present day boundaries of the county.The City of Philadelphia, as laid out by Penn, comprised only that portion of the present day city situated between South and Vine Streets and the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers. Other settlements were made beyond the boundaries of the city, and in the course of time they became separately incorporated and had separate governments.Several of these settlements were situated immediately contiguous to the 'city proper' of Philadelphia such as Southwark and Moyamensing in the south, the Northern Liberties District, Kensington, Spring Garden and Penn District to the north, and West Philadelphia and Blockley to the west — which combined with the City of Philadelphia formed practically one continuously built up town, the whole group being known abroad simply as Philadelphia.Besides these, there were a number of other outlying townships, villages and settlements throughout the county. Over time, as the population expanded out from the City of Philadelphia, those closer to the City of Philadelphia became absorbed in the congeries of towns of which greater Philadelphia was composed, while those further away from the city often joined with other townships, villages and settlements to form the newer counties of Berks and Montgomery.During this period, the city government of Philadelphia and the county government of Philadelphia acted separately. By the mid-19th century, it was clear that a more structured government bureaucracy was needed. A reform charter, on February 2, 1854, brought all the boroughs, townships and districts of the County of Philadelphia within the City of Philadelphia, thus abolishing the patchwork of cities, boroughs, and townships that had made up Philadelphia County since its founding.The city-county consolidation was a result of the inability of a colonial-type government by committees to adapt to the needs of a growing city for new public services, for example, better streets, police, transportation, sanitation and schools.The newly integrated districts had marked characteristics between them, but over time, after the consolidation, these characteristics generally integrated into the City of Philadelphia known today. Today, the names of some of these districts are synonymous with neighborhoods in the city, with their boundaries roughly matching their historic boundaries.In 1951, a new initiative called the Home Rule Charter fully merged city and county offices. This new charter provided the city with a common structure and outlined the 'strong mayor' form of government that is still used today.The county offices were merged with the city government in 1952, effectively eliminating the county as a governmental structure in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Even though the county no longer has a government structure by law, in both the Unconsolidated Pennsylvania Statutes and The Philadelphia Code and Charter, the County of Philadelphia is still an entity within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is thus subject to the provisions and laws of the Commonwealth concerning counties. Exceptions include restrictions stated in the Home Rule Charter of Philadelphia, Act of Consolidation, 1854, and subsequent legislation. The county also is the only First Class County, meaning it had a population of 1.5 million or above at the last census, in the Commonwealth.Philadelphia has become racially and ethnically diverse over the years, and this process continues. Since 1990, (the year that immigration began increasing), thousands of immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Europe have arrived in the county. Today, the city has some of the largest Puerto Rican, Italian, Korean, Vietnamese, Russian, Ukrainian, Jamaican, Chinese, Arab, Irish, Thai and Cambodian populations in America. The county has the fourth largest concentration of African Americans in North America, including large representations of Liberians, Nigerians, and Sudanese. The Northeast section of the city, and more significantly the suburbs of Philadelphia, contain vast numbers of Indian Americans and Mexicans. Government Currently, Philadelphia County has no government structure. Prior to the Act of Consolidation in 1854 a Board of Commissioners governed the county in accordance with the law of Pennsylvania at the time.The origins of the Board of Commissioners are found in the office of Tax Assessor in Philadelphia County, established by an Act of the Pennsylvania General Assembly on 27 November 1700. Tax Assessor was an office of six persons, elected annually to estimate the County's fiscal needs, to make an assessment and levy a tax to meet them, and to appoint its collectors and the County Treasurer.On 28 March 1710, the Assembly approved an act that created an appointed Board of County Commissioners, which was changed to a notable elected board in 1725. The Commissioners were empowered to demand accountings of the Assessors and Collectors and to appoint new collectors if necessary. Subsequent acts passed by the Assembly in 1715, 1718 and 1722 expanded the power and the scope of the Board, granting the Commissioners authority to share with the assessors in the assessment process and in the allocation of tax receipts among the various county projects, to take part in the appointment of the County Treasurer, and to issue warrants and levy fines against delinquent taxpayers and collectors. Other Acts passed during the eighteenth century gave the Commissioners regulatory powers and maintenance functions in regard to county lands, roads, bridges, wharves and landings, courts and the county prison.In 1780, the Assembly passed an Act that abolished the Board of County Assessors and left its functions in the hands of the Commissioners alone, who continued to appoint the assessors and collectors of each of the county's boroughs, townships and districts. Further legislation in 1799 and 1805 formally established the Commissioners' functions of furnishing lists of voters to election officers and aiding the Sheriff in the selection of jurors, as both were based upon lists of taxpayers. During the first half of the nineteenth century, the Commissioners' duties were further increased to include the leasing of polling places, the provision of ballot boxes, and related duties.The consolidation of the City and County of Philadelphia in 1854 abolished the Board of County Commissioners, with most of its functions transferred to the popularly elected City Commissioners who, although retaining their original title and duties, were thenceforth considered County officers. Because the City Commissioners were considered County officers, they were still regulated by State laws concerning County Commissioners. The City Commissioners should not be confused with the City Council, as these are two separate entities.Even though the governments of the both the City and County were effectively consolidated by the Act of Consolidation, not all offices and agencies, such as the Board of Inspectors of the County Prison (Philadelphia Prison System), Coroner, Recorder of Deeds, and Sheriff, that were under the control of the county prior to the consolidation were transferred to the city, though their oversight and regulation were now handled by the City Commissioners. Other offices and agencies, like that of Offices of City Tax Collector and County Tax Collector were reduced to that of clerk in the new office of Receiver of Taxes. Both Commissioners' (City and County) powers in regard to streets and City property were transferred to the City's Departments of Highways and City Property. From 1854 until 1867, the Commissioners also served as members of the Board of Revision of Taxes. In 1867, the City Assessors were made appointees of that Board.The powers left to the Commissioners were chiefly accounting ones over County institutions, regulatory duties regarding weights and measures (given them by an Act of 1895) and administrative functions in connection with elections, which culminated in complete control of their conduct with the formation of the County Board of Elections under their direction in 1937.Although not mentioned in the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter, the City Commissioners' Office became part of the City government by way of the 1951 City-County Amendment to the State Constitution. In addition, the 1963 amendment to the First Class Cities Home Rule Act gave City Council the power to pass legislation with regard to operations of the City Commissioners' Office. The 1965 City-County Consolidation Ordinance of City Council further enabled these enactments. Politics Philadelphia County is by far the most Democratic county in Pennsylvania. In 2004, John Kerry received 542,205 votes (80%) to 130,099 votes (19%) for George W. Bush, making it Kerry's strongest county in the state, which he narrowly won. The county has voted for the Democrat in every presidential election since 1932. On numerous occasions, it has been the only county in the state to vote for a Democrat. Even Republican Senator Arlen Specter, a Philadelphia resident, did not receive one third of the Philadelphia vote in his most recent election, which he won easily; however, Specter switched to the Democratic Party in 2009. Districts, townships, and boroughs of the County of Philadelphia before 1854 Aramingo Borough Belmont District Blockley Township Bridesburg Borough Bristol Township Byberry Township Delaware Township Frankford Borough Germantown Borough Germantown Township Kensington District Kingsessing Township Lower Dublin Township Manayunk Borough Moreland Township Moyamensing District Northern Liberties District Northern Liberties Township Oxford Township Passyunk Township Penn District Penn Township Philadelphia City Richmond District Roxborough Township Southwark District Spring Garden District West Philadelphia Borough Whitehall Borough
source: http://en.wikipedia.org: 
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