U.S. Warrant Records Database - Guaranteed Instant Results


 Loading...
This state has no counties.
Gender:  All  Male  Female

Sussex County Delaware Warrant Search

In order to search for active arrest warrants in Sussex County Delaware , you can either physically go to your local police department, pay a small fee and get the report you need (not the best choice of you need to check your own name) or you can use our advanced online warrant record databases to instantly and discreetly check millions of records with a single click. Use the search form above to either check your local jurisdiction, or better yet - run an Out-of-State (Nationwide) arrest warrant search, to search for warrant & arrest records found in other jurisdictions - about the individual.
GovWarrantSearch.org, is a recognized and trusted online records information provider, that lets you utilize a network of multiple data sources, to discreetly search thousands of court orders, criminal files and more than 1.2 billion records - with a single click, and receive the facts about people you wish to investigate (including yourself) without leaving the comfort of your home or office. Statistics show that many people that have a "clean" criminal history record, showing no convictions or former arrests in a background check, are in fact outlaws that avoided trial and have active warrants out for their arrest. Our comprehensive criminal records check is a detailed report showing warrants and other records that you would not be able to obtain through many regular online public records providers. GovWarrtantSearch.org lets you access the same resources used by the police, licensed PI's and bounty hunters seeking information on whereabouts of criminals with warrants or others that avoided trial. All the details you could possibly need about the subject are provided to you in one criminal report. Avoid the need to personally visit dozens of courthouses to get these records. Simply fill out the form above and within less than 30 seconds you're search will be over, and facts will show on your screen.

The Definition of a Warrant

Law enforcement agents can't just randomly arrest or search individuals that they believe to be involved in a crime. In order to prevent police officers from trampling on the rights of citizens, there is a due process that must be followed, and a warrant is one of these processes. A warrant is simply a signed document from a judge, allowing police to take an action. Depending upon the type of warrant, that action can be the arrest of a named individual or the search of a residence. Judges can sign off on three major types of warrants: Search Warrants, Bench Warrants, and Arrest Warrants. Each one is different depending upon the situation.

What is an Arrest Warrant?

An arrest warrant is a legal document that is signed by a judge and enables law enforcement to make an immediate arrest of an individual. These are often issued when a crime has been committed and the police have a particular suspect that they would like to apprehend. Arrest warrants give police enforcement the right to even enter homes to apprehend a suspect if necessary.

How Do You Find Out If Someone Has An Arrest Warrant Against Them?

Some law enforcement agents will notify suspects of an arrest warrant via a letter at the last known address or through a phone call. While others swoop down and make an immediate arrest. At a nominal cost, the local police department will provide you with arrest information for an individual. However, you should never check your own record in this manner because you will be immediately arrested if there are active warrants on your record. The easiest approach is to make use of an online public records service that will provide you with all of the information in one easy to read format.

What is a Bench Warrant?

It's extremely important to attend any court appearances that you are scheduled for. If you do not appear in court, a judge will hold you in contempt of court and sign a bench warrant with your name on it. From this point on, you will instantly be considered a fugitive from justice in the eyes of the law. This court order will allow the police to arrest you on sight and even enter your home in order to apprehend you. It's important to remember that there is no statute of limitations for a bench warrant. This type of warrant never expires and will only be cleared upon your death or arrest.

What is a Search Warrant?

If the police believe that a crime has been committed or is being committed in a particular area, they will request a search warrant from a judge. This document will enable them to perform a complete search on the area listed on the warrant. They can be given full rights to walk into your home to gather evidence, and you are not able to stop them. An example of this can be seen when the police use warrants to seize narcotics or weapons from a home. It's important to keep in mind that a search warrant is extremely specific, and will often label the exact location, the specific evidence, and time of search. Police officers cannot continuously return to your home to gather more evidence unless another search warrant is obtained. If law enforcement officers violate any of the conditions of the warrant, they will not be allowed to present the evidence in court.

What are Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants?

Outstanding warrants and active warrants are synonymous and used interchangeably in the court system. Active warrants are placed against an individual when they have either been suspected of committing a crime (arrest warrant) or if they did not appear for a court date (bench warrant). An active or outstanding warrant gives the police the right to immediately arrest the individual on sight, using all necessary means. The term outstanding warrant is generally used when describing an older warrant from a fugitive that has been avoiding police arrest for quite some time. Do not confuse this term, and believe that it means `expired warrant', because arrest warrants never expire.

Searching For Arrest Warrants in Sussex County Delaware

When doing a search for active arrest warrants, there are a few methods that can be used. You can go down to the local police department and obtain a records search by providing the officer with pertinent information and paying a small fee for the results. However, you are advised against using this method if you are checking up on yourself or a friend. If you are doing a personal search on yourself and an arrest warrant appears on record, you will be arrested immediately. If it is for a friend, you will be subjected to questioning and possibly risk your friend's freedom or even worse endanger your own freedom for aiding a fugitive from justice. The most common method to search for arrest warrants is through a public online service like GovWarrantSearch.org. One major benefit of this type of online service is that you are able to gather information about yourself or anyone else in the privacy of your own home. In addition, a good online warrant search site will provide you with more information because you can either specifically search for warrants in Sussex County Delaware, or you can perform either statewide or even a nationwide search to review an individual's complete record. This saves you numerous trips to multiple police departments. You should also keep in mind that a visit to the local police department will only show you results from that local area and you could be missing information from other jurisdictions.

Is It Possible To Have An Arrest Warrant On File And Not Know About It?

Probably one of the biggest misconceptions of arrest warrants is that the police will notify you and allow you to surrender yourself with an attorney. Sure, this happens sometimes, but law enforcement agents aren't required to make proper notification in advance of incarceration. Most people are informed of the warrant at the time of their arrest. Depending on the crime and workload of the police department, officers may arrive at your place of work, home, or the home's of family and friends to attempt to serve their warrant and make an arrest.

How Can I Avoid Being Apprehended With An Arrest Warrant On File?

Avoiding arrest with an arrest warrant on file would certainly prove to be a difficult life, and not recommended. The police can make an arrest at your home or work, so you will always be looking over your shoulder. Police records show that the majority of individuals with an arrest warrant against them are arrested on a minor traffic stop. An arrest warrant never goes away, and the police will eventually catch up with you.

When Does A Warrant Expire?

The only type of warrant that has an expiration date is a search warrant. Arrest warrants and bench warrants will only expire upon the death of the convict or a court appearance (usually due to an arrest). These types of warrants do not have any statute of limitations and have no expiration date.


General Information from wikipedia: 
Sussex County, Delaware Sussex County is a county located in the southern part of the U.S. state of Delaware. As of 2000 the population was 156,638. The county seat is Georgetown. In 2009, the population of the county was estimated to be 192,747, an increase of 23.1%. The Seaford Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Sussex County.Sussex County is Delaware's largest county by land area, with 938 square miles (2,429 km2). The first European settlement in the state of Delaware was founded in 1631 near the present-day town of Lewes. However, Sussex County was not organized until 1683. Beginnings Archaeologists estimate that the first inhabitants of Sussex County, the southernmost county in Delaware, arrived between 10,000 and 14,000 years ago. Native Americans in Sussex County called themselves by the various tribal names of the Algonquin Nation. The most prominent tribes in the area were the Leni Lenape and Nanticoke tribes. The people settled along the numerous bodies of water in the area where they were able to harvest fish, oysters, and other shellfish in the fall and winter. In the warmer months they planted crops, and hunted deer and other small mammals as larger game was not present in the area. European Discovery There is no universally agreed upon group known to be the first to settle in Sussex County. In the early years of exploration, from 1593 to 1630, many feel the Spanish or Portuguese were probably the first to see the Delaware River and the lands of present day Sussex County.Henry Hudson, on his expedition for the Dutch West India Company, discovered the Delaware River in 1609. Attempting to following him, Samuel Argall, an English explorer, was blown off course in 1610 and landed in a strange bay that he named after the Governor of Virginia, Thomas West, Lord De La Warr.In the first half of 1613, Cornelius Jacobsen Mey, a Dutch navigator, discovered and named both Cape May, New Jersey and Cape Henlopen, (originally Hindlopen) in the Delaware Bay. Later it was found that what May had named Henlopen, was actually Fenwick Island protruding into the Atlantic Ocean, and the name of the cape was moved to its present location just east of Lewes. European Settlement Sussex County was the site of the first European settlement in Delaware, a trading post named Zwaanendael at the present site of Lewes. On June 3, 1631, Dutch captain David Pietersen de Vries landed along the shores of the Delaware to establish a whaling colony in the mid-Atlantic of the New World. The colony only lasted until 1632, when De Vries left. Upon returning to Zwaanendael that December, he found the Indian tribes had killed his men and burned the colony. The Dutch then set about settling the area once again.The original boundaries were undefined with boundary disputes between the family of William Penn, who claimed the county extended to Fenwick Island, and Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore, who claimed the county ended at Lewes with all the land south of that belonging to Somerset County. Maryland and Pennsylvania both claimed the land between the 39th and 40th parallels according to the charters granted to each colony. The 'Three Lower Counties' (Delaware) along Delaware Bay moved into the Penn sphere of settlement, and later became the Delaware Colony, a satellite of Pennsylvania.In 1732 the proprietary governor of Maryland, Charles Calvert, signed an agreement with William Penn's sons which drew a line somewhere in between, and also renounced the Calvert claim to Delaware. But later Lord Baltimore claimed that the document he signed did not contain the terms he had agreed to, and refused to put the agreement into effect. Beginning in the mid-1730s, violence erupted between settlers claiming various loyalties to Maryland and Pennsylvania. The border conflict between Pennsylvania and Maryland would be known as Cresap's War.The issue was unresolved until the Crown intervened in 1760, ordering Frederick Calvert, 6th Baron Baltimore to accept the 1732 agreement. As part of the settlement, the Penns and Calverts commissioned the English team of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon to survey the newly established boundaries between the Province of Pennsylvania, the Province of Maryland, Delaware Colony and parts of Colony and Old Dominion of Virginia.Between 1763 and 1767, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon surveyed the Mason-Dixon line settling Sussex County's western and southern borders. After Pennsylvania abolished slavery in 1781, the western part of this line and the Ohio River became a border between free and slave states, although Delaware remained a slave state.In 1769 there was a movement started to move the county seat from Lewes to the area then known as Cross Roads, the present day site of Milton. The current county seat of Georgetown was settled upon on January 27, 1791 after residents in western Sussex County successfully petitioned the Delaware General Assembly to move the county seat to a central location as roads at the time made it too difficult to reach the county seat in Lewes. Georgetown was not a previously established town and on May 9, 1791, the 10 commissioners headed by President of the State Senate George Mitchell negotiated the purchase of 76 acres (310,000 m2) and Commissioner Rhodes Shankland began the survey by laying out 'a spacious square of 100 yards (91 m) each way.' Eventually the Town was laid out in a circle one mile (1.6 km) across, centered on the original square surveyed by Shankland and now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Georgetown was named after Senate President George Mitchell.Sussex County has been known by several names over the years including Susan County, Hoorenkill or Whorekill County as named by the Dutch prior to 1680 when Kent County broke off, Deale County from 1680 to 1682 after being taken over by the British under James Stuart, Duke of York prior to signing over to William Penn, and Durham County when claimed by the Lords Baltimore during the boundary dispute with the Penn family. Law and government Sussex county's government is composed of an elected legislature and various elective executive heads of departments.The county council has five members; all are elected in and for specific geographic subdivisions for four years. This forms the legislative authority of the county, which then chooses a 'County Administrator' or executive.The current county council members are Council President Vance Phillips, George Cole, Joan Deaver, Michael H. Vincent and Samuel R. Wilson.The additional offices of Clerk of the Peace, Register of Deeds, Register of Chancery and Sheriff are elected at large.. These positions are held by George Parish, John Brady, David Wilson Sr., and Eric Swanson, respectively. Public Schools Sussex County is served by eight public school districts. Kent is served by six districts and New Castle is served by seven districts.Cape Henlopen School District Delmar School District Indian River School District Laurel School District Milford School District (also serves Kent County) Seaford School District Sussex Technical School District(County-wide overlay school district) Woodbridge School District The county also contains one charter school, the Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences.Those state funded public high schools which participate in sporting events are members of the Henlopen Conference.[citation needed] Private Schools There are several private schools in Sussex County. The schools include Bible Center Christian Academy located in Laurel, Children Craft CO in Seaford, Christian Tabernacle Academy in Lincoln City, Destiny Christian School in Georgetown, Eagle's Nest Christian School in Milton, Epworth Christian School in Laurel, Greenwood Mennonite School in Greenwood, Harbor Christian Academy in Ellendale, The Jefferson School in Georgetown, Jesus Is Lord Christian Academy in Georgetown, Lighthouse Christian School in Dagsboro, Lighted Pathway Christian Academy in Seaford, Milford Christian School in Milford, and Seaford Christian Academy in Seaford. Secondary Schools There are also several secondary schools in Sussex County. Delaware Technical & Community College has the largest presence in the county, but students can also attend Delaware State University, Goldey-Beacom College, University of Delaware, Wesley College all in Georgetown, the Philadelphia Bible College in Ellendale, and the Beebe Hospital School of Nursing in Lewes. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,196 square miles (3,097 km²), of which 938 square miles (2,428 km²) is land and 258 square miles (668 km²) (21.58%) is water.The eastern portion of the county is home to most of Delaware's beaches and many seaside resorts. The western side of the county is center of Delaware's agriculture industry with more acres of arable land under cultivation than anywhere else in the state.[citation needed] Adjacent Counties Kent County, Delaware- north Cape May County, New Jersey- northeast¹ Worcester County, Maryland- south Dorchester County, Maryland- southwest Wicomico County, Maryland- southwest Caroline County, Maryland- northwest ¹ across Delaware Bay; no land border Major highways There are three major north-south highways in Sussex County:US Route 13in the west, US Route 113in the middle, and State Route 1along the coast In addition, Sussex has a number of east-west thoroughfares, the primary being U.S. Route 9. State Routes 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 54 and 404 also service the area, providing alternatives east-west routes to most municipalities in the county. National protected area Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge Economy The average home and property price in Sussex County increased 250% in the ten years between 1995 and 2005. Local increases within Sussex County for this period include a 381% increase for Millsboro and a 609% increase for Millville. Sussex County is served by the Delaware Coast Line Railway, the Maryland & Delaware Railway and the Norfolk Southern Railway. Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 156,638 people, 62,577 households, and 43,866 families residing in the county. The population density was 167 people per square mile (64/km²). There were 93,070 housing units at an average density of 99 per square mile (38/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 80.35% White, 14.89% Black or African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.75% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.02% from other races, and 1.35% from two or more races. 4.41% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 14.9% were of English, 14.3% United States or American (Mostly British), 12.9% Irish, 12.5% German and 5.6% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000. 93.3% spoke English and 4.3% Spanish as their first language.There were 62,577 households out of which 27.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 11.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 24.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.88.In the county the population was spread out with 22.50% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 26.30% from 25 to 44, 25.60% from 45 to 64, and 18.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.The median income for a household in the county was $39,208, and the median income for a family was $45,203. Males had a median income of $30,811 versus $23,625 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,328. About 7.70% of families and 10.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.00% of those under age 18 and 8.40% of those age 65 or over. Cities and towns Bethany Beach Bethel Blades Bridgeville Dagsboro Delmar(part of Delmar is inMaryland) Dewey Beach Ellendale Fenwick Island Frankford Georgetown Greenwood Henlopen Acres Laurel Lewes Milford(part of Milford is inKent County) Millsboro Millville Milton Ocean View Rehoboth Beach Seaford Selbyville Slaughter Beach South Bethany Non-Incorporated Communities Gumboro Lincoln Long Neck Oak Orchard Festivals, Fairs, and Events Sussex County, Delaware is home to several festivals, fairs, and events. Some of the more notable festivals are the Riverfest held in Seaford, the World Championship Punkin Chunkin held at various locations throughout the county since 1986, the Rehoboth Beach Chocolate Festival, the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral to mark the end of summer, the Apple Scrapple Festival held in Bridgeville, the Rehoboth Beach Jazz Festival, the Sea Witch Halloween Festival and Parade in Rehoboth Beach, the Rehoboth Beach Independent Film Festival the Nanticoke Indian Pow Wow in Oak Orchard, and the Return Day Parade held after elections in even-numbered years in Georgetown. Newspapers Cape Gazette, Lewes Coastal Point, Ocean View Delaware Coast Press, Rehoboth Beach Delaware Wave, Bethany Beach Hoy en Delaware, Georgetown Laurel Star, Laurel Leader & State Register, Seaford Milford Beacon, Milford Milford Chronicle, Milford Seaford Star, Seaford Sussex Countian, Georgetown Sussex Post, Georgetown The Script, Georgetown (published at various times throughout the school year, stories by DelTech students majoring in communications) Television Stations WBOCTV-16, Milton,CBS&Fox WDPB, Seaford,PBS WRDE-LP, Rehoboth Beach, MyTV and Retro TV (Low-power broadcastingchannel)
source: http://en.wikipedia.org: 
wikipedia.org

ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY AND TERMS
Note: This site is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency. State seals on the website's pages simply mean that searches are available for these states.
Text taken from Wikipedia is marked as such and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (found at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). Additional terms may apply. See details at http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Terms_of_Use. Note that non of Wikipedia's text on this site should be considered as endorsing this site or any of it's content in any way.

By using this site, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil & criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.
Copyright 2009 GovWarrantSearch.com. All rights reserved.

Copyscape