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Palatka Florida FL Warrant Search

If you want to search for outstanding arrest warrants in Palatka Florida FL - the easiest and safest way would be to use an online warrant search service that will allow you to gather information from several different local and national databases and provide you with a detailed report regarding the individual's warrant status, without leaving the comfort of your home or office.

If you are doing a new search on yourself, it is recommended that you use govwarrantsearch.org. This is a discreet warrant search service that will allow you to search anonymously without fear of prosecution. This is probably one of the most trusted and thorough services in the industry.

With govwarrantsearch.org, you will have access to the same technology that both law enforcement and private investigators use on a daily basis. The service will compile everything about your subject in one detailed report and make for easy analysis. Having all of this information in less than a minute is as easy as filling out the form above.

If you prefer the "manual" approach - You can always visit your local law enforcement office for this information. The police officer will charge you a nominal fee and provide you with a print-out of the individual's warrant record. It is not suggested to do this type of search on yourself. Obviously, the police officer will be forced to arrest you if they find that you have a Florida FL warrant against your record.

The Definition of a Warrant

The simplest way to define a warrant is: a court document that commands police to take a particular action. There are several different types of warrants, but the most common are arrest warrants and search warrants.
While arrest warrants command police to arrest individuals, search warrants command of the police to search specified locations. A warrant is a legal document, signed by a judge and administered by the police.

The Definition of an Arrest Warrant

Fortunately in the United States, Police Departments are not allowed to randomly arrest its citizens. First, a judge must sign a legal document called an arrest warrant before law enforcement can make an arrest. Arrest warrants can be issued for various reasons, but, failure to appear at court is the most common cause. Keep in mind that police officers will enter homes and places of business to incarcerate fugitives with arrest warrants on their record.

How to Find Out If You Have a Warrant in Palatka Florida FL :


Whether you're searching for a warrant on yourself or others, you have a few options to get the job done. The first option is to head down to your local police department and make a warrant request. The only problem with this option is that you usually need a good reason to do a search on someone else. If you convinced the officer that you have a good reason - obtaining a warrant report will cost a nominal fee, and a bit of patience. Keep in mind that this is a low priority request, and the police officer at the front desk will often take their time with your arrest warrant search.
A word of warning: this method is not suggested if you are doing an arrest warrant search on yourself. If the police determine that you have an active warrant, they will arrest you and you will not have a chance to prepare your defense. You also shouldn't use this method when checking on the status of family members or close friends as well. This is because the police will attempt to gather information about the person's whereabouts. You could even be brought into the situation if you attempt to deceive the police, as obstructing justice is a crime.

The easiest and safest way to check if someone has an outstanding warrant on file is by using a public online search engine, like govwarrantsearch.org. This site will allow you to instantly investigate anyone's background using all national databases and receive the information that you need without having to go anywhere in person. You can easily gather information from many databases with a single click, and either conduct an in-state search for warrants in Palatka Florida FL , or use the "Nationwide" option to search for warrants anywhere else in the entire United States. Aside from being quick and easy, an online search is also beneficial because of the privacy that it affords you. You can avoid putting your freedom in jeopardy by searching online. Using a public online search like govwarrantsearch.org is the recommended method for anyone that needs arrest warrant information.

Bench Warrants Defined

A bench warrant is placed against any individual that does not show up for a court date as scheduled. This warrant directs law enforcement to seek out this individual and place them into custody. As far as the police are concerned, an individual with a bench warrant is a fugitive at large.

If you have a bench warrant against you, it is important to take care of the situation as soon as possible. Usually, local law enforcement officers are very active when it comes to serving bench warrants. It is not uncommon for the police to arrive at your home at 2 AM to take you to jail.

Search Warrants Defined

A search warrant is a court order document that allows a particular law enforcement agency to search a home or place of business for proof of illegal activity. Search warrants are signed by a judge and very specific in nature. Law enforcement must adhere to the verbiage of the document or risk having their evidence inadmissible in court. Search warrants have a specific expiration date and the police cannot continue to return without a new search warrant.

If you are served with a search warrant, you should ask to read the warrant to ensure that the police are following the court order properly. It will detail the types of evidence that can be removed, when they are allowed to search, as well as the limitations on where law enforcement are allowed to search. While law enforcement officers are allowed to confiscate any contraband that they locate during the search (drugs, unregistered weapons, etc.), they can only remove evidence listed in the search warrant.

Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants Explained

Both active warrants and outstanding warrants have the same meaning and can be used equally in the eyes of the law. With that being said, the term, "outstanding warrant" is most often used to describe warrants that are several years old. Regardless of the chosen phrase, both outstanding warrants and active warrants are court-ordered documents that allow law enforcement to arrest an individual using any means necessary.

I Have Not Been Notified By The Police - Could I Still Have An Arrest Warrant On File?
You should never wait on notification from the police to determine if you have an arrest warrant on file. The sad truth is that the majority of individuals arrested were unaware of a warrant on their record. Silvia Conrad experienced this first hand when a police officer randomly appeared at her place of work. She was completely unaware of a warrant placed against her, but was hauled off to jail. While it may create an embarrassing experience, the police will do whatever it takes to apprehend you.

To understand why you may not be notified properly, you should look at it from the prospective of the police. It basically makes law enforcement's job much easier. The police would rather catch you off guard than prepared and ready to run. Bottom Line - Whether you have been notified or not, the police will find you and arrest you to serve their warrant.
How to Avoid Being Picked Up On An Arrest Warrant

Before you get your hopes up and think that you can actually live a normal life with an arrest warrant on your record, you must realize that this is an impossible venture. Even if you were capable of eluding the police for quite some time, your life would be anything but normal. The thought of a looming arrest would always be on your mind, and would force you to constantly `watch your back' for the police.

Unfortunately, the sad truth is that the majority of arrest warrants get served years after the warrant is issued. "Don't Run!" is probably the best advice that one can receive. Its much better to take care of the problem as soon as possible than wait until you've gotten your life back together and find that you're being drawn back into the same old situation..

Do Arrest Warrants Expire?

Regardless of the state that the warrant was filed, there is no expiration of an arrest warrant. These warrants will only go away in the case of:
a) Death
b) Appearance before the judge that ordered the warrant
c) Arrest
 


General Information from wikipedia: 
Palatka, Florida Palatka is a city in Putnam County, Florida, United States. The population was 10,033 at the 2000 census. As of 2004, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 10,796. It is the county seat of Putnam County and includes East Palatka. The city is home to St. Johns River Community College and Ravine Gardens State Park and hosts a bluegrass music festival twice a year. History The area was once the domain of the Timucuan peoples, two tribes of which existed in the Palatka region under chiefs Saturiwa and Utina. They fished bass and mullet, or hunted deer, turkeys, bear and opossum. Others farmed beans, corn, melons, squash and tobacco. But infectious disease that came with European contact and war devastated the tribes, and they were extinct by the mid-18th century. The last people evacuated with the Spanish to Cuba in 1763, when Spain ceded Florida to Great Britain after the Seven Years War.During the late eighteenth century, remnants of Creek and other tribes made their way to Florida. In a process of ethnogenesis, the Seminole tribe was formed. They called the location Pilo-taikita, meaning “crossing over”, or “cows’ crossing.” Here the St. Johns River narrows and begins a shallower, winding course upstream to Lake George and Lake Monroe.In 1767, Denys Rolle, an English philanthropist and nobleman, established Rollestown on the east bank of the St. Johns River at the head of deep-water navigation. His 78,000-acre (320 km²) plantation was a utopian commercial and humanitarian experiment, recruiting settlers off the streets of London, including paupers, vagrants, pickpockets and 'penitent prostitutes.' Two hundred indentured servants arrived to clear wilderness for agriculture and livestock. Unaccustomed to either hard work or a subtropical climate, however, they scattered. Rolle next imported slaves from West Africa to tend chickens, hogs, goats and sheep, or produce cotton, indigo, citrus and turpentine for export to England.He built a mansion and laid out a village, but trouble beleaguered the 'ideal society.' In 1770, a disgruntled overseer sold over 1,000 of his employer's cattle and disappeared with the money. Rolle hired new overseers and bought more slaves, but the plantation failed to prosper. When Spain resumed control of Florida in 1783, Rolle abandoned the colony and chartered a ship to carry his household belongings, livestock and slaves to a 2,000acre (8 km²) estate on Great Exuma in the Bahamas. The point in East Palatka, is still called Rollestown.With changes of sovereignty in Florida came numerous changes of ownership in Pilo-taikita, now contracted to Pilatka. In 1774, naturalist William Bartram noted an Indian village on the west bank, but it was abandoned before later European Americans came to settle. After the United States acquired Florida in 1821, Nehemiah Brush established a ferry and bought a 1,200-acre (4.9 km²) tract in 1826 and another of equal size the next year. The site became a distribution point, where goods were shipped by a New York company to supply immigrants at the Grant of Arredondo, which lay to the west.The arrival of land-hungry American settlers created confrontations with the resident Seminole. When the government attempted to relocate the tribe to the west of the Mississippi as part of Indian Removal starting in 1833, the Second Seminole War began. The Seminole attacked and burned Pilatka in 1835. Recognizing the site's strategic importance for control of the St. Johns River, the main artery into Central Florida, the US Army in 1838 established Fort Shannon, named for Captain Samuel Shannon. It included a garrison, supply depot and hospital. During 1842 the Seminole were driven from the area, and consequently Fort Shannon was abandoned by the army in 1843. Settlers made use of the military piers and buildings, including eight blockhouses, to develop the town. By 1847, it was growing rapidly. In 1849, Putnam County was created, with Pilatka the county seat. With the help of Judge Isaac H. Bronson, it was incorporated as a city on January 8, 1853.During the 1850s, Florida in general and Pilatka in particular gained a reputation as a haven for invalids' escaping northern winters. Steamboats carried them up the river in increasing numbers. One visitor wrote that amusements included 'sailing, fishing, rowing, walking, riding in buggy and on horseback, whist, enchre, backgammon and hunting.'The tourist trend was interrupted by the Civil War, when gunboats cruised the waters and Pilatka was destitute and largely deserted. On October 7, 1862, the USS Cimarron fired several shells over the town after seeing some Confederate cavalry. Mary Boyd pleaded with Union Commander Maxwell Woodhull to spare Pilatka, assuring him that the horse soldiers were not residents. He complied.Following the war, tourists returned to find new hotels, including the Putnam House, built by Hubbard L. Hart, and the Larkin House, which had accommodations for 250 guests. Steamers ran up the Ocklawaha River to Eustis, Leesburg and Silver Springs, or the St. Johns River to Enterprise and Sanford. Industries included logging, raising cattle and hogs, and orange groves. On May 24, 1875, the post office changed the spelling to Palatka, ending confusion with Picolata.By the 1880s, several competing railroads crossed the community, which became an important junction. These included the Florida Southern Railroad, the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railroad, the St. Augustine and Palatka Railway, and the Georgia Southern and Florida Railroad. On November 7, 1884, Palatka suffered a devastating fire. Guests arrived that season to find no accommodations, and so continued on the train south; this was the beginning of a gradual shift of tourism elsewhere. The city lost trade, shipping and transportation preeminence to Jacksonville, on the coast. With its downtown rebuilt in brick to be fireproof, Palatka emerged a finer place.In 1893, A. E. and H. S. Wilson of Saginaw, Michigan bought the Noah J. Tilghman & Son sawmill, which processed cypress lumber. Renamed the Wilson Cypress Company, it expanded operations and became a major employer. At its peak, it was the second largest cypress mill in the world, but closed in 1944. The Great Freeze of 1894 and 1895 destroyed Palatka's citrus groves for 5 years, which were formerly a major attraction. The ill-fated Cross Florida Barge Canal was once intended to pass the city. Today, tourism remains important. Notable residents Isaac H. Bronson, judge and congressman William L. Calhoun, admiral John Crawford, author William A. Forward, politician and judge Hubbard Hart, steamboat operator and hotelier John Henry Lloyd, National Baseball Hall of Fame, 1977 Steven Douglas Merryday, judge Michelle McCool,WWEprofessional wrestler William Dunn Moseley, first governor of Florida Medwin Peek, Florida architect Stephen Jon Postal, film director and producer Kelly R. Smith, congressman Joseph Warren Stilwell, general Mary McLeod Bethune, educator, founder Bethune Cookman University Mary Emily Boyd, citizen who in 1862 saved Palatka from being burned Jarvis Williams (American football), professional football player John Williams (fullback), professional football player Demographics As of the census of 2004, there were 10,796 people, 3,880 households, and 2,421 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,442.1 people per square mile (556.6/km²). There were 4,318 housing units at an average density of 620.7/sq mi (239.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 48.93% White, 48.43% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.83% of the population.There were 3,880 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.0% were married couples living together, 24.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.6% are other types of families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.10.In the city the population was spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 81.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 75.8 males.The median income for a household in the city was $18,129, and the median income for a family was $26,076. Males had a median income of $27,716 versus $19,187 for females. The per capita income for the city was $11,351. About 27.9% of families and 33.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 41.0% of those under age 18 and 19.6% of those age 65 or over. Transportation Palatka Municipal Airport is a public-use airport located 3 kilometers (2 miles) northwest of the central business district.Two Amtrak services — the Silver Star and the Silver Meteor — stop at Palatka Railroad Station. Sites of interest The following entries are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:Old Atlantic Coast Line Union Depot, home of thePalatka Railroad Preservation Society Bronson-Mulholland House(1854), home of thePutnam County Historical Society & Museum Central Academy Larimer Memorial Library Palatka North Historic District Palatka South Historic District Ravine Gardens State Park St. Mark's Episcopal Church
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