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Harrisburg PA Pennsylvania Warrant Search

If you want to search for outstanding arrest warrants in Harrisburg PA Pennsylvania - the easiest and safest way would be to use an online warrant search service that will allow you to gather information from several different local and national databases and provide you with a detailed report regarding the individual's warrant status, without leaving the comfort of your home or office.

If you are doing a new search on yourself, it is recommended that you use govwarrantsearch.org. This is a discreet warrant search service that will allow you to search anonymously without fear of prosecution. This is probably one of the most trusted and thorough services in the industry.

With govwarrantsearch.org, you will have access to the same technology that both law enforcement and private investigators use on a daily basis. The service will compile everything about your subject in one detailed report and make for easy analysis. Having all of this information in less than a minute is as easy as filling out the form above.

If you prefer the "manual" approach - You can always visit your local law enforcement office for this information. The police officer will charge you a nominal fee and provide you with a print-out of the individual's warrant record. It is not suggested to do this type of search on yourself. Obviously, the police officer will be forced to arrest you if they find that you have a PA Pennsylvania warrant against your record.

The Definition of a Warrant

The simplest way to define a warrant is: a court document that commands police to take a particular action. There are several different types of warrants, but the most common are arrest warrants and search warrants.
While arrest warrants command police to arrest individuals, search warrants command of the police to search specified locations. A warrant is a legal document, signed by a judge and administered by the police.

The Definition of an Arrest Warrant

Fortunately in the United States, Police Departments are not allowed to randomly arrest its citizens. First, a judge must sign a legal document called an arrest warrant before law enforcement can make an arrest. Arrest warrants can be issued for various reasons, but, failure to appear at court is the most common cause. Keep in mind that police officers will enter homes and places of business to incarcerate fugitives with arrest warrants on their record.

How to Find Out If You Have a Warrant in Harrisburg PA Pennsylvania :


Whether you're searching for a warrant on yourself or others, you have a few options to get the job done. The first option is to head down to your local police department and make a warrant request. The only problem with this option is that you usually need a good reason to do a search on someone else. If you convinced the officer that you have a good reason - obtaining a warrant report will cost a nominal fee, and a bit of patience. Keep in mind that this is a low priority request, and the police officer at the front desk will often take their time with your arrest warrant search.
A word of warning: this method is not suggested if you are doing an arrest warrant search on yourself. If the police determine that you have an active warrant, they will arrest you and you will not have a chance to prepare your defense. You also shouldn't use this method when checking on the status of family members or close friends as well. This is because the police will attempt to gather information about the person's whereabouts. You could even be brought into the situation if you attempt to deceive the police, as obstructing justice is a crime.

The easiest and safest way to check if someone has an outstanding warrant on file is by using a public online search engine, like govwarrantsearch.org. This site will allow you to instantly investigate anyone's background using all national databases and receive the information that you need without having to go anywhere in person. You can easily gather information from many databases with a single click, and either conduct an in-state search for warrants in Harrisburg PA Pennsylvania , or use the "Nationwide" option to search for warrants anywhere else in the entire United States. Aside from being quick and easy, an online search is also beneficial because of the privacy that it affords you. You can avoid putting your freedom in jeopardy by searching online. Using a public online search like govwarrantsearch.org is the recommended method for anyone that needs arrest warrant information.

Bench Warrants Defined

A bench warrant is placed against any individual that does not show up for a court date as scheduled. This warrant directs law enforcement to seek out this individual and place them into custody. As far as the police are concerned, an individual with a bench warrant is a fugitive at large.

If you have a bench warrant against you, it is important to take care of the situation as soon as possible. Usually, local law enforcement officers are very active when it comes to serving bench warrants. It is not uncommon for the police to arrive at your home at 2 AM to take you to jail.

Search Warrants Defined

A search warrant is a court order document that allows a particular law enforcement agency to search a home or place of business for proof of illegal activity. Search warrants are signed by a judge and very specific in nature. Law enforcement must adhere to the verbiage of the document or risk having their evidence inadmissible in court. Search warrants have a specific expiration date and the police cannot continue to return without a new search warrant.

If you are served with a search warrant, you should ask to read the warrant to ensure that the police are following the court order properly. It will detail the types of evidence that can be removed, when they are allowed to search, as well as the limitations on where law enforcement are allowed to search. While law enforcement officers are allowed to confiscate any contraband that they locate during the search (drugs, unregistered weapons, etc.), they can only remove evidence listed in the search warrant.

Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants Explained

Both active warrants and outstanding warrants have the same meaning and can be used equally in the eyes of the law. With that being said, the term, "outstanding warrant" is most often used to describe warrants that are several years old. Regardless of the chosen phrase, both outstanding warrants and active warrants are court-ordered documents that allow law enforcement to arrest an individual using any means necessary.

I Have Not Been Notified By The Police - Could I Still Have An Arrest Warrant On File?
You should never wait on notification from the police to determine if you have an arrest warrant on file. The sad truth is that the majority of individuals arrested were unaware of a warrant on their record. Silvia Conrad experienced this first hand when a police officer randomly appeared at her place of work. She was completely unaware of a warrant placed against her, but was hauled off to jail. While it may create an embarrassing experience, the police will do whatever it takes to apprehend you.

To understand why you may not be notified properly, you should look at it from the prospective of the police. It basically makes law enforcement's job much easier. The police would rather catch you off guard than prepared and ready to run. Bottom Line - Whether you have been notified or not, the police will find you and arrest you to serve their warrant.
How to Avoid Being Picked Up On An Arrest Warrant

Before you get your hopes up and think that you can actually live a normal life with an arrest warrant on your record, you must realize that this is an impossible venture. Even if you were capable of eluding the police for quite some time, your life would be anything but normal. The thought of a looming arrest would always be on your mind, and would force you to constantly `watch your back' for the police.

Unfortunately, the sad truth is that the majority of arrest warrants get served years after the warrant is issued. "Don't Run!" is probably the best advice that one can receive. Its much better to take care of the problem as soon as possible than wait until you've gotten your life back together and find that you're being drawn back into the same old situation..

Do Arrest Warrants Expire?

Regardless of the state that the warrant was filed, there is no expiration of an arrest warrant. These warrants will only go away in the case of:
a) Death
b) Appearance before the judge that ordered the warrant
c) Arrest
 


General Information from wikipedia: 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Gloria Martin-Roberts (President) Patty Kim (Vice President) Brad Koplinski Wanda D. Williams Susan Brown Wilson Kelly D. Summerford Eugenia G. Smith Harrisburg is the capital of the United States Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 49,528, making it the ninth largest city in Pennsylvania, after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown, Erie, Reading, Scranton, Bethlehem and Lancaster. Harrisburg is the county seat of Dauphin County and lies on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, 105 miles (169 km) west-northwest of Philadelphia.The Harrisburg-Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Dauphin, Cumberland, and Perry counties, had a population of 509,074 in 2000. A July 1, 2007 estimate placed the population at 528,892, making it the fifth largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in Pennsylvania after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown–Bethlehem–Easton (the Lehigh Valley), and Scranton–Wilkes Barre. The Harrisburg-Carlisle-Lebanon Combined Statistical Area, including both the Harrisburg-Carlisle and Lebanon Metropolitan Statistical Areas, had an estimated population of 656,781 in 2007 and was the fourth-most populous metropolitan area in the state.Harrisburg played a notable role in American history during the Westward Migration, the American Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. During part of the 19th century, the building of the Pennsylvania Canal and later the Pennsylvania Railroad allowed Harrisburg to become one of the most industrialized cities in the Northeastern United States. The U.S. Navy ship USS Harrisburg, which served from 1918 to 1919 at the end of World War I, was named in honor of the city.In the mid-to-late 20th century, the city's economic fortunes fluctuated with its major industries consisting of government, heavy manufacturing including the production of steel, agriculture (the greater Harrisburg area is at the heart of the fertile Pennsylvania Dutch Country), and food services (nearby Hershey is home of the chocolate maker, located just 10 miles east of Harrisburg). In 1981, following contractions in the steel and dairy industries, Harrisburg was declared the second most distressed city in the nation. The city subsequently experienced a resurgence under its former mayor Stephen R. Reed, with nearly $3 billion in new investment realized during his lengthy tenure.In 2010 Forbes rated Harrisburg as the second best place to raise a family. Despite the city's recent financial troubles, in 2010 The Daily Beast website ranked 20 metropolitan areas across the country as being recession-proof, and the Harrisburg region landed at No. 7. The financial stability of the region is in part due to the high concentration of state and federal government agencies.The Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest free indoor agriculture exposition in the United States, was first held in Harrisburg in 1917 and has been held there every early to mid January since then. Harrisburg also hosts an annual outdoor sports show, the largest of its kind in North America, as well as an auto show, which features a large static display of new as well as classic cars and is renowned nationwide. Harrisburg is also known for the Three Mile Island accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979 near Middletown. Founding Harrisburg's site along the Susquehanna River is thought to have been inhabited by Native Americans as early as 3000 BC. Known to the Native Americans as 'Peixtin', or 'Paxtang', the area was an important resting place and crossroads for Native American traders, as the trails leading from the Delaware to the Ohio rivers, and from the Potomac to the Upper Susquehanna intersected there. The first European contact with Native Americans in Pennsylvania was made by the Englishman, Captain John Smith, who journeyed from Virginia up the Susquehanna River in 1608 and visited with the Susquehanna tribe. In 1719, John Harris, Sr., an English trader, settled here and 14 years later secured grants of 800 acres (3.2 km2) in this vicinity. In 1785, John Harris, Jr. made plans to lay out a town on his father's land, which he named Harrisburg. In the spring of 1785, the town was formally surveyed by William Maclay, who was a son-in-law of John Harris, Sr. In 1791, Harrisburg became incorporated and was named the Pennsylvania state capital in October 1812, and has been since. Railroads and the American Industrial Revolution During the first part of the 19th century, Harrisburg was a notable stopping place along the Underground Railroad, as escaped slaves would be transported across the Susquehanna River and were often fed and given supplies before heading north towards Canada. The assembling here of the Harrisburg Convention in 1827 led to the passage of the high protective-tariff bill of 1828. In 1839, Harrison and Tyler were nominated for President of the United States at the first national convention of the Whig Party of the United States, which was held in Harrisburg. By the 1830s Harrisburg was part of the Pennsylvania canal system and an important railroad center as well. Steel and iron became dominant industries. Steel and other industries continued to play a major role in the local economy throughout the latter part of the 19th century. The city was the center of enormous railroad traffic and supported large furnaces, rolling mills, and machine shops. The Pennsylvania Steel Company plant, which opened in nearby Steelton in 1866, was the first in the country; later operated by Bethlehem Steel. American Civil War During the American Civil War, Harrisburg was a significant training center for the Union Army, with tens of thousands of troops passing through Camp Curtin. It was also a major rail center for the Union and a vital link between the Atlantic coast and the Midwest, with several railroads running through the city and spanning the Susquehanna River. As a result of this importance, it was a target of General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during its two invasions. The first time during the 1862 Maryland Campaign, when Lee planned to capture the city after taking Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, but was prevented from doing so by the Battle of Antietam and his subsequent retreat back into Virginia. The second attempt was made during the Gettysburg Campaign in 1863 and was more substantial. A short skirmish took place in June 1863 at Sporting Hill, just 2 miles west of Harrisburg. This is considered by many to be the northern-most battle of the Civil War. Early 20th century to present In the early 20th century, several Harrisburg residents became involved in the City Beautiful movement. Mira Lloyd Dock and Horace McFarland advocated urban improvements which were influenced by European urban planning design and the World's Columbian Exposition. Specifically, their efforts greatly enlarged the Harrisburg park system, creating Riverfront Park, Reservoir Park, the Italian Lake and Wildwood Park. In addition, schemes were undertaken for the burial of electric wires, the creation of a modern sanitary sewer system, and the beautification of an expanded Capitol complex.Many important events have helped to shape Harrisburg over the years. The Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest indoor agriculture exposition in the United States, was first held in 1917 and has been held every January since then. The present location of the Show is the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Arena, located at the corner of Maclay and Cameron streets. In June 1972, Harrisburg was hit by a major flood from the remnants of hurricane Agnes.On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island nuclear plant, along the Susquehanna River located in Londonderry Township which is south of Harrisburg, suffered a partial meltdown. Although the meltdown was contained and radiation leakages were minimal, there were still worries that an evacuation would be necessary. Governor Dick Thornburgh, on the advice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Joseph Hendrie, advised the evacuation 'of pregnant women and pre-school age children ... within a five-mile radius of the Three Mile Island facility.' Within days, 140,000 people had left the area.After Harrisburg suffered years of being in bad shape economically, Stephen R. Reed was elected mayor in 1981 and served until 2009, making him the city's longest serving mayor. He immediately started projects which would attract both businesses and tourists. Several museums and hotels such as Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts, the National Civil War Museum and the Hilton Harrisburg and Towers were built during his term, along with many office buildings and residences. Several semi-professional sports franchises, including the Harrisburg Senators of the Eastern League, the defunct Harrisburg Heat indoor soccer club and the Harrisburg City Islanders of the USL Second Division began operations in the city during his tenure as mayor. While praised for the vast number of economic improvements, Reed has also been criticized for population loss and mounting debt. For example, during a budget crisis the city was forced to sell $8 million worth of Western and American-Indian artifacts collected by Mayor Reed for a never-realized museum celebrating the American West. Topography Harrisburg is located at 40°16′11″N 76°52′32″W / 40.26972°N 76.87556°W / 40.26972; -76.87556 (40.269789, -76.875613) in South Central Pennsylvania. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.4 square miles (29.6 km2), of which, 8.1 square miles (21.0 km2) of it is land and 3.3 square miles (8.6 km2) of it (29.11%) is water. Bodies of water include Paxton Creek which empties into the Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, as well as Wildwood Lake and Italian Lake parks.Directly to the north of Harrisburg is the Blue Mountain ridge of the Appalachian Mountains. The Cumberland Valley lies directly to the west of Harrisburg and the Susquehanna River, stretching into northern Maryland. The fertile Lebanon Valley lies to the east. Harrisburg is the northern fringe of the historic Pennsylvania Dutch Country.The city is the county seat of Dauphin County. The adjacent counties are Northumberland County to the north; Schuylkill County to the northeast; Lebanon County to the east; Lancaster County to the south; and York County to the southwest; Cumberland County to the west; and Perry County to the northwest. Adjacent municipalities Harrisburg's western boundary is formed by the Susquehanna River, which also serves as the boundary between Dauphin and Cumberland counties. The city is divided into numerous neighborhoods and districts. Like many of Pennsylvania's cities and boroughs that are at 'build-out' stage, there are several townships outside of Harrisburg city limits that, although autonomous, use the name Harrisburg for postal and name-place designation. They include the townships of: Lower Paxton, Middle Paxton, Susquehanna, Swatara and West Hanover in Dauphin County. The borough of Penbrook, located just east of Reservoir Park, was previously known as East Harrisburg. Penbrook, along with the borough of Paxtang, also located just outside of the city limits, maintain Harrisburg zip codes as well. The United States Postal Service designates 26 zip codes for Harrisburg, including 13 for official use by federal and state government agencies. Climate Harrisburg has a variable, four-season climate in the transition between the humid subtropical and humid continental zones (Köppen Cfa and Dfa, respectively)。 The hottest month of the year is July with an 24-hour average of 75.9 °F (24.4 °C). Summer is usually hot and humid and occasional heat waves can occur from time to time. The city averages around 15 days per year with above 90 degree temps although temperatures above 100 degrees are rare. The hottest temperature ever recorded in Harrisburg is 107 °F (42 °C) in July 1966. Summer thunderstorms also occur relatively frequently. Fall is a pleasant season when the humidity and temperatures fall to more comfortable values.Winter in Harrisburg is cold: January averages 30.3 °F (−0.9 °C). A major snowstorm can also occasionally occur, and some winters snowfall totals can exceed 60 inches while in other winters the city may receive very little snowfall. The snowiest month recorded on record was in February 2010 when 42 inches of snow was recorded at Harrisburg International Airport. Overall Harrisburg receives an average of 35 inches of snow annually. The coldest temperature ever recorded in Harrisburg was −22 °F (−30 °C) in January 1994. Spring is also a nice time of year for outdoor activities. Precipitation is well-distributed and generous in most months, though May is clearly the wettest. Neighborhoods Center City Harrisburg, which includes the Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex, is the central core business and financial center for the greater Harrisburg metropolitan area and serves as the seat of government for Dauphin County and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. There are over a dozen large neighborhoods and historic districts within the city. Architecture Harrisburg is home to the Pennsylvania State Capitol. Completed in 1906, the central dome rises to a height of 272 feet (83 m) and was modeled on that of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City, Rome. The building was designed by Joseph Miller Huston and is adorned with sculpture, most notably the two groups, Love and Labor, the Unbroken Law and The Burden of Life, the Broken Law by sculptor George Grey Barnard; murals by Violet Oakley and Edwin Austin Abbey; tile floor by Henry Mercer, which tells the story of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The state capitol is only the third-tallest building of Harrisburg. The five tallest buildings are 333 Market Street with a height of 341 feet (104 m), Pennsylvania Place with a height of 291 feet (89 m), the Pennsylvania State Capitol with a height of 272 feet (83 m), Presbyterian Apartments with a height of 259 feet (79 m) and the Fulton Bank Building with a height of 255 feet (78 m). Economy Harrisburg is the metropolitan center for some 400 communities. Its economy and more than 7,000 businesses are diversified with a large representation of service-related industries, especially health-care and a growing technological industry to accompany the dominant government field inherent to being the state's capital. National firms either headquartered in the region or with major operations include Tyco Electronics, EDS, IBM, Hershey Foods, Harsco Corporation, and Rite Aid Corporation. The largest employers, the federal and state governments, provide stability to the economy. The regions extensive transportation infrastructure has allowed it become a prominent center for trade, warehousing, and distribution. Top employers According to the 2009 report from the Harrisburg Regional Chamber, the top employers in the region are: Culture Downtown Harrisburg has two major performance centers. The Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts, which was completed in 1999, is the first center of its type in the United States where education, science and the performing arts take place under one roof. The Forum, a 1,763-seat concert and lecture hall built in 1930-31, is a state-owned and operated facility located within the State Capitol Complex. Since 1931, The Forum has been home to the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra.Beginning in 2001, downtown Harrisburg saw a surge of commercial nightlife development. This has been credited with reversing the city's financial decline, and has made downtown Harrisburg a destination for events from jazz festivals to Top-40 nightclubs.Harrisburg is also the home of the annual Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest agricultural exhibition of its kind in the nation. Farmers from all over Pennsylvania come to show their animals and participate in competitions. Livestock are on display for people to interact with and view. In 2004, Harrisburg hosted CowParade, an international public art exhibit that has been featured in major cities all over the world. Fiberglass sculptures of cows are decorated by local artists, and distributed over the city centre, in public places such as train stations and parks. They often feature artwork and designs specific to local culture, as well as city life and other relevant themes. Demographics As of the 2010 census, the city was 30.7% White, 52.4% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian, and 5.2% were two or more races. 18.0% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.In the census of 2000, there were 48,950 people, 20,561 households, and 10,917 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,035.6 people per square mile (2,330.4/km²). There were 24,314 housing units at an average density of 2,997.9 per square mile (1,157.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 54.83% Black or African American, 31.72% White, 0.37% Native American, 2.83% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 6.54% from other races, and 3.64% from two or more races. 11.69% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Harrisburg is the 6th most populous city in eastern Pennsylvania and 47th in the nation of Vietnamese population with 2,649 residents.There were 20,561 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 23.4% were married couples living together, 24.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.9% were non-families. 39.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 3.15.In the city the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.8 males.The median income for a household in the city was $26,920, and the median income for a family was $29,556. Males had a median income of $27,670 versus $24,405 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,787. About 23.4% of families and 24.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.9% of those under age 18 and 16.6% of those age 65 or over.The very first census taken in the United States occurred in 1790. At that time Harrisburg was a small, but substantial colonial town with a population of 875 residents. With the increase of the city's prominence as an industrial and transportation center, Harrisburg reached its peak population build up in 1950, topping out at nearly 90,000 residents. Since the 1950s, Harrisburg, along with other northeastern urban centers large and small, has experienced a declining population that is ultimately fueling the growth of its suburbs, although the decline - which was very rapid in the 1960s and 1970s - has slowed considerably since the 1980s. Unlike Western and Southern states, Pennsylvania maintains a complex system of municipalities and has very little legislation on either the annexation/expansion of cities or the consolidating of municipal entities.Reversing fifty years of decline, 2007 Census Bureau estimates show that Harrisburg's population has actually grown. Between 2006 and 2007, Harrisburg gained 22 people. In 2009 the urban population of the Harrisburg area increased to 383,008 from 362,782 in 2000, a change of 20,226 people. In 2010, the Harrisburg area was listed with Lebanon and York as a urban agglomeration, or a contiguous area of continuously developed urban land, signifying a future merger of the York-Hanover and Harrisburg metropolitan areas, which would create a metropolitan area of over 1 million. Media The Harrisburg area has two daily newspapers. The Patriot-News is published in Harrisburg and has a daily circulation of over 100,000. The Sentinel, which is published in Carlisle, roughly 20 miles west of Harrisburg, serves many of Harrisburg's western suburbs in Cumberland County. The Press and Journal, published in Middletown, is one of many weekly, general information newspapers in the Harrisburg area. Harrisburg has one monthly community newspaper, TheBurg. There are also numerous television and radio stations in the Harrisburg/Lancaster/York area, which makes up the 39th largest media market in the nation. Newspapers Harrisburg Gossip(community gossip & news) The Burg(community newspaper) Central Penn Business Journal Carlisle Sentinel The Patriot-News Press and Journal (Pennsylvania) Television The Harrisburg TV market is served by:WGAL- (NBC) WLYH-TV- (The CW) WHBG-TV- cable-only, public access WHP-TV- (CBS) WHTM-TV- (ABC) W35BT- (CTVN) WITF-TV- (PBS) WPMT- (Fox) WGCB-TV- independent, religious PCN-TV, is acable televisionnetworkdedicated to 24-hour coverage ofgovernmentandpublic affairsin thecommonwealth. Roxbury News- independent news Radio According to Arbitron, Harrisburg's radio market is ranked #78th in the nation.This is a list of FM stations in the greater Harrisburg, Pennsylvania metropolitan area.This is a list of AM stations in the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania metropolitan area: Harrisburg in film Several feature films and television series have been filmed or set in and around Harrisburg and the greater Susquehanna Valley. Museums, art collections, and sites of interest Broad Street Market, one of the oldest continuously operatingfarmers marketsin the United States. Capital Area Greenbelt, a twenty mile longgreenwaylinking city neighborhoods, parks and open spaces Dauphin County Veteran's Memorial Obeliskinspired by the classicRoman/Egyptianobeliskform; located inuptownHarrisburg Fort Hunter Mansion and Park, located north of downtown Harrisburg on a bluff overlooking the Susquehanna River John Harris - Simon Cameron Mansion, a National Historic Landmark located in downtown Harrisburg along the river Market Square, originally planned in 1785 and serves as the pinnacle of downtown National Civil War Museum, located at Reservoir Park andaffiliatedwith theSmithsonian Institutionin Washington, D.C. Pennsylvania National Fire Museum Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, one of the largest convention/exhibition centers on the east coast Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex, the center of government for thecommonwealthand home to thestate capitol building,state archives, andstate library Reservoir Park, the largest public park in the city State Museum of Pennsylvania Strawberry Square, across the street from the Capitol Complex, home of many state offices and a small shopping center Susquehanna art museum, located in downtown Harrisburg Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts, features anIMAXtheater Parks and recreation City Island and Beach Riverfront Park Italian Lake, 9.4 acre park located in theUptownneighborhood. Wildwood Lake Park Reservoir Park Capital Area Greenbelt Notable residents Since the early 18th century, Harrisburg has been home to many people of note. Because it is the seat of government for the state and lies relatively close to other urban centers, Harrisburg has played a significant role in the nation's political, cultural and industrial history. Harrisburgers have also taken a leading role in the development of Pennsylvania's history for over two centuries. Two former U.S. Secretaries of War, Simon Cameron and Alexander Ramsey and several other prominent political figures, such as former speaker of the house Newt Gingrich, hail from Harrisburg. The actor Don Keefer was born near Harrisburg, along with the actor Richard Sanders, most famous for playing Less Nessmen in WKRP in Cincinnati . Many notable individuals are interred at Harrisburg Cemetery and East Harrisburg Cemetery. Sports Harrisburg serves as the hub of professional sports in South Central Pennsylvania. A host of teams compete in the region including three professional baseball teams, the Harrisburg Senators, the Lancaster Barnstormers, and the York Revolution. The Senators are the oldest team of the three, with the current incarnation playing since 1987. The original Harrisburg Senators began playing in the Eastern League in 1924. Playing its home games at Island Field, the team won the league championship in the 1927, 1928, and 1931 seasons. The Senators played a few more seasons before flood waters destroyed Island Field in 1936, effectively ending Eastern League participation for fifty-one years. In 1940, Harrisburg gained an Interstate League team affiliated with the Pittsburgh Pirates; however, the team remained in the city only until 1943, when it moved to nearby York and renamed the York Pirates. The current Harrisburg Senators, affiliated with the Washington Nationals, have won the Eastern League championship in the 1987, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 seasons. City of Harrisburg Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. City Government Center, the only city hall in the United States named for a civil rights leader, serves as a central location for the administrative functions of the city. Harrisburg has been served since 1970 by the 'strong mayor' form of municipal government, with separate executive and legislative branches. The Mayor serves a four-year term with no term limits. As the full-time chief executive, the Mayor oversees the operation of 34 agencies, run by department and office heads, some of whom comprise the Mayor's cabinet, including the Departments of Public Safety (police and fire bureaus), Public Works, Business Administration, Parks and Recreation, Incineration and Steam Generation, Building & Housing Development and Solicitor. The city has 721 employees (2003). The current mayor of Harrisburg is Linda D. Thompson, whose term expires January 2014.There are seven city council members, all elected at large, who serve part-time for four-year terms. There are two other elected city posts, city treasurer and city controller, who separately head their own fiscally related offices. The current city controller is Daniel C. Miller, whose term expires in January 2014. Property tax reform Harrisburg is also known nationally for its use of a two tiered land value taxation. Harrisburg has taxed land at a rate six times that on improvements since 1975, and this policy has been credited by its former mayor, Stephen R. Reed, as well as by the city's former city manager during the 1980s with reducing the number of vacant structures located in downtown Harrisburg from about 4,200 in 1982 to fewer than 500 in 1995. During this same period of time between 1982 and 1995, nearly 4,700 more city residents became employed, the crime rate dropped 22.5% and the fire rate dropped 51%.Harrisburg, as well as nearly 20 other Pennsylvania cities, employs a two-rate or split-rate property tax, which requires the taxing of the value of land at a higher rate and the value of the buildings and improvements at a lower one. This can be seen as a compromise between pure LVT and an ordinary property tax falling on real estate (land value plus improvement value). Alternatively, two-rate taxation may be seen as a form that allows gradual transformation of the traditional real estate property tax into a pure land value tax.Nearly two dozen local Pennsylvania jurisdictions, such as Harrisburg, use two-rate property taxation in which the tax on land value is higher and the tax on improvement value is lower. In 2000, Florenz Plassmann and Nicolaus Tideman wrote that when comparing Pennsylvania cities using a higher tax rate on land value and a lower rate on improvements with similar sized Pennsylvania cities using the same rate on land and improvements, the higher land value taxation leads to increased construction within the jurisdiction. 2009-2010 Budget Crisis In 2009, the financial crisis and resulting recession took their toll on Harrisburg's municipal finances. Harrisburg was not able to budget for $68m in debt payments due to a local $288m incinerator project. On September 1, 2010, the city announced its intention to skip a debt payment of $3.29m on the incinerator project and Daniel C. Miller, the City Controller, has suggested possible trouble with the City's General Obligation bonds. Chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy may well be in Harrisburg's future. Harrisburg moved one step closer to Ch. 9 on Nov 10, 2010 after they accepted an offer from New York bankruptcy attorney Cravath, Swaine and Moore for free bankruptcy advisory services. Dauphin County Dauphin County Government Complex, in downtown Harrisburg, serves the administrative functions of the county. The trial court of general jurisdiction for Harrisburg rests with the Court of Dauphin County and is largely funded and operated by county resources and employees. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania The Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex dominates the city's stature as a regional and national hub for government and politics. All administrative functions of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are located within the complex and at various nearby locations.The Commonwealth Judicial Center houses Pennsylvania's three appellate courts, which are located in Harrisburg. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, which is the court of last resort in the state, hears arguments in Harrisburg as well as Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The Superior Court of Pennsylvania and the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania are located here. Judges for these courts are elected at large. Federal Government The Ronald Reagan Federal Building and Courthouse, located in downtown Harrisburg, serves as the regional administrative offices of the federal government. A branch of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania is also located within the courthouse. Due to Harrisburg's prominence as the state capital, federal offices for nearly every agency are located within the city.The United States military has a strong historic presence in the region. A large retired military population resides in South Central Pennsylvania and the region is home to a large national cemetery at Indiantown Gap. The federal government, including the military, is the top employer in the metropolitan area.Military bases in the Harrisburg area include: Airports Domestic and International airlines provide services via Harrisburg International Airport (MDT), which is located southeast of the city in Middletown. HIA is the third-busiest commercial airport in Pennsylvania, both in terms of passengers served and cargo shipments. Passenger carriers that serve HIA include US Airways, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Continental Airlines, Air Canada, and AirTran Airways. Capital City Airport (CXY), a moderate-sized business class and general aviation airport, is located across the Susquehanna River in the nearby suburb of New Cumberland, south of Harrisburg. Both airports are owned and operated by the Susquehanna Area Regional Airport Authority (SARAA), which also manages the Franklin County Regional Airport in Chambersburg and Gettysburg Regional Airport in Gettysburg. Mass transit Harrisburg is served by Capital Area Transit (CAT) which provides public bus, paratransit, and commuter rail service throughout the greater metropolitan area. Construction of a commuter rail line designated the Capital Red Rose Corridor (previously named CorridorOne) will eventually link the city with nearby Lancaster in 2010.[dated info]Long-term plans for the region call for the commuter rail line to continue westward to Cumberland County, ending at Carlisle. In early 2005, the project hit a roadblock when the Cumberland County commissioners opposed the plan to extend commuter rail to the West Shore. Due to lack of support from the county commissioners, the Cumberland County portion, and the two new stations in Harrisburg have been removed from the project. In the future, with support from Cumberl

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