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Providence Rhode Island RI Warrant Search

If you want to search for outstanding arrest warrants in Providence Rhode Island RI - the easiest and safest way would be to use an online warrant search service that will allow you to gather information from several different local and national databases and provide you with a detailed report regarding the individual's warrant status, without leaving the comfort of your home or office.

If you are doing a new search on yourself, it is recommended that you use govwarrantsearch.org. This is a discreet warrant search service that will allow you to search anonymously without fear of prosecution. This is probably one of the most trusted and thorough services in the industry.

With govwarrantsearch.org, you will have access to the same technology that both law enforcement and private investigators use on a daily basis. The service will compile everything about your subject in one detailed report and make for easy analysis. Having all of this information in less than a minute is as easy as filling out the form above.

If you prefer the "manual" approach - You can always visit your local law enforcement office for this information. The police officer will charge you a nominal fee and provide you with a print-out of the individual's warrant record. It is not suggested to do this type of search on yourself. Obviously, the police officer will be forced to arrest you if they find that you have a Rhode Island RI warrant against your record.

The Definition of a Warrant

The simplest way to define a warrant is: a court document that commands police to take a particular action. There are several different types of warrants, but the most common are arrest warrants and search warrants.
While arrest warrants command police to arrest individuals, search warrants command of the police to search specified locations. A warrant is a legal document, signed by a judge and administered by the police.

The Definition of an Arrest Warrant

Fortunately in the United States, Police Departments are not allowed to randomly arrest its citizens. First, a judge must sign a legal document called an arrest warrant before law enforcement can make an arrest. Arrest warrants can be issued for various reasons, but, failure to appear at court is the most common cause. Keep in mind that police officers will enter homes and places of business to incarcerate fugitives with arrest warrants on their record.

How to Find Out If You Have a Warrant in Providence Rhode Island RI :


Whether you're searching for a warrant on yourself or others, you have a few options to get the job done. The first option is to head down to your local police department and make a warrant request. The only problem with this option is that you usually need a good reason to do a search on someone else. If you convinced the officer that you have a good reason - obtaining a warrant report will cost a nominal fee, and a bit of patience. Keep in mind that this is a low priority request, and the police officer at the front desk will often take their time with your arrest warrant search.
A word of warning: this method is not suggested if you are doing an arrest warrant search on yourself. If the police determine that you have an active warrant, they will arrest you and you will not have a chance to prepare your defense. You also shouldn't use this method when checking on the status of family members or close friends as well. This is because the police will attempt to gather information about the person's whereabouts. You could even be brought into the situation if you attempt to deceive the police, as obstructing justice is a crime.

The easiest and safest way to check if someone has an outstanding warrant on file is by using a public online search engine, like govwarrantsearch.org. This site will allow you to instantly investigate anyone's background using all national databases and receive the information that you need without having to go anywhere in person. You can easily gather information from many databases with a single click, and either conduct an in-state search for warrants in Providence Rhode Island RI , or use the "Nationwide" option to search for warrants anywhere else in the entire United States. Aside from being quick and easy, an online search is also beneficial because of the privacy that it affords you. You can avoid putting your freedom in jeopardy by searching online. Using a public online search like govwarrantsearch.org is the recommended method for anyone that needs arrest warrant information.

Bench Warrants Defined

A bench warrant is placed against any individual that does not show up for a court date as scheduled. This warrant directs law enforcement to seek out this individual and place them into custody. As far as the police are concerned, an individual with a bench warrant is a fugitive at large.

If you have a bench warrant against you, it is important to take care of the situation as soon as possible. Usually, local law enforcement officers are very active when it comes to serving bench warrants. It is not uncommon for the police to arrive at your home at 2 AM to take you to jail.

Search Warrants Defined

A search warrant is a court order document that allows a particular law enforcement agency to search a home or place of business for proof of illegal activity. Search warrants are signed by a judge and very specific in nature. Law enforcement must adhere to the verbiage of the document or risk having their evidence inadmissible in court. Search warrants have a specific expiration date and the police cannot continue to return without a new search warrant.

If you are served with a search warrant, you should ask to read the warrant to ensure that the police are following the court order properly. It will detail the types of evidence that can be removed, when they are allowed to search, as well as the limitations on where law enforcement are allowed to search. While law enforcement officers are allowed to confiscate any contraband that they locate during the search (drugs, unregistered weapons, etc.), they can only remove evidence listed in the search warrant.

Outstanding Warrants and Active Warrants Explained

Both active warrants and outstanding warrants have the same meaning and can be used equally in the eyes of the law. With that being said, the term, "outstanding warrant" is most often used to describe warrants that are several years old. Regardless of the chosen phrase, both outstanding warrants and active warrants are court-ordered documents that allow law enforcement to arrest an individual using any means necessary.

I Have Not Been Notified By The Police - Could I Still Have An Arrest Warrant On File?
You should never wait on notification from the police to determine if you have an arrest warrant on file. The sad truth is that the majority of individuals arrested were unaware of a warrant on their record. Silvia Conrad experienced this first hand when a police officer randomly appeared at her place of work. She was completely unaware of a warrant placed against her, but was hauled off to jail. While it may create an embarrassing experience, the police will do whatever it takes to apprehend you.

To understand why you may not be notified properly, you should look at it from the prospective of the police. It basically makes law enforcement's job much easier. The police would rather catch you off guard than prepared and ready to run. Bottom Line - Whether you have been notified or not, the police will find you and arrest you to serve their warrant.
How to Avoid Being Picked Up On An Arrest Warrant

Before you get your hopes up and think that you can actually live a normal life with an arrest warrant on your record, you must realize that this is an impossible venture. Even if you were capable of eluding the police for quite some time, your life would be anything but normal. The thought of a looming arrest would always be on your mind, and would force you to constantly `watch your back' for the police.

Unfortunately, the sad truth is that the majority of arrest warrants get served years after the warrant is issued. "Don't Run!" is probably the best advice that one can receive. Its much better to take care of the problem as soon as possible than wait until you've gotten your life back together and find that you're being drawn back into the same old situation..

Do Arrest Warrants Expire?

Regardless of the state that the warrant was filed, there is no expiration of an arrest warrant. These warrants will only go away in the case of:
a) Death
b) Appearance before the judge that ordered the warrant
c) Arrest
 


General Information from wikipedia: 
Providence, Rhode Island Providence is the capital and the most populous city in Rhode Island, and one of the first cities established in the United States. Located in Providence County, it is the estimated second or third largest city in the New England region. Despite the city proper only having an estimated population of 178,042 as of 2010, it anchors the 37th largest metropolitan population in the country, with an estimated MSA population of 1,600,856, exceeding that of Rhode Island by about 60% due to its reaching into southern Massachusetts. Situated at the mouth of the Providence River, at the head of Narragansett Bay, the city's small footprint is crisscrossed by seemingly erratic streets and contains a rapidly changing demographic.Providence was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a religious exile from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He named the area in honor of 'God's merciful Providence' which he believed was responsible for revealing such a haven for him and his followers to settle. After being one of the first cities in the country to industrialize, Providence became noted for its jewelry and silverware industry. Today, the City of Providence is home to eight hospitals and seven institutions of higher learning, which has shifted the city's economy into service industries, though it still retains significant manufacturing activity.Once nicknamed the 'Beehive of Industry', Providence began rebranding itself as the 'Creative Capital' in 2009 to emphasize its educational resources and arts community. Its previous moniker was 'The Renaissance City', though its 2000 poverty rate was still among the ten highest for cities over 100,000. History The area which is now Providence was first settled in June 1636 by Roger Williams, and was one of the original Thirteen Colonies of the United States. Although the west bank of the Providence River was later claimed by both the English and the Dutch, the actual inhabitants and true masters of the region were the Pokanoket Tribe of the Wampanoag Nation led by Massasoit Ousamequin. Williams secured permission to settle from the Pokanoket and gave the city its present name. Williams' Providence soon became a refuge for persecuted religious dissenters, as he himself had been exiled from Massachusetts. Providence's growth would be slow during the next quarter-century—the subsuming of its territory into surrounding towns, difficulty of farming the land, and differing of local traditions and land conflicts all slowed development.In the mid-1770s, the British government levied taxes that impeded Providence's maritime, fishing and agricultural industries, the mainstay of the city's economy. One example was the Sugar Act, which was a tax levied against Providence's distilleries that adversely affected its trade in rum and slaves. These taxes caused Providence to join the other colonies in renouncing allegiance to the British Crown. In response to enforcement of unpopular trade laws, Providence residents spilled the first blood of the American Revolution in the notorious Gaspée Affair of 1772.Though during the Revolutionary War the city escaped enemy occupation, the capture of nearby Newport disrupted industry and kept the population on alert. Troops were quartered for various campaigns and Brown University's University Hall was used as a barracks and military hospital.After departing from Newport, French troops sent by King Louis XVI and commanded by the Comte de Rochambeau passed through Providence on their way to join the attack against British forces. The march from Newport to Providence was the beginning of a campaign led jointly by General George Washington in a decisive march that ended with the defeat of General Cornwallis in the Siege of Yorktown at Yorktown, Virginia and the Battle of the Chesapeake.Following the war, Providence was the country's ninth-largest city. with 7,614 people. The economy shifted from maritime endeavors to manufacturing, particularly machinery, tools, silverware, jewelry and textiles. By the turn of the twentieth century, Providence boasted some of the largest manufacturing plants in the country, including Brown & Sharpe, Nicholson File, and Gorham Silverware. The city's industries attracted many immigrants from Ireland, Germany, Sweden, England, Italy, Portugal, Cape Verde, and French Canada. Economic and demographic shifts caused social strife, notably with a series of race riots between whites and blacks during the 1820s. In response to these troubles and the economic growth, Providence residents ratified a city charter in 1831 as the population passed 17,000.During the Civil War, local politics split over slavery as many had ties to Southern cotton. Despite ambivalence concerning the war, the number of military volunteers routinely exceeded quota, and the city's manufacturing proved invaluable to the Union. Postwar, horsecar lines covering the city enabled its growth and Providence thrived with waves of immigrants and land annexations bringing the population from 54,595 in 1865 to 175,597 by 1900.The city's boom began to wane in the mid-1920s as industries, notably textiles, shut down. Jewelry manufacturing continued to grow, taking up the slack and employing many of the city's new immigrants, coming from Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Lithuanian and Jewish backgrounds. A number of hospitals also opened. The Great Depression hit the city hard, and Providence's downtown was subsequently flooded by the New England Hurricane of 1938. Though the city received a boost from World War II, this ended with the war. The city saw further decline as a result of nation-wide trends, with the construction of highways and increased suburbanization. The population would drop by 38% over the next three decades. From the 1950s to the 1980s, Providence was a notorious bastion of organized crime. The mafia boss Raymond L.S. Patriarca ruled a vast criminal enterprise.The city's 'Renaissance' began in the 1970s. From 1975 until 1982, $606 million of local and national Community Development funds were invested throughout the city, and the hitherto falling population began to stabilize. In the 1990s, Mayor Vincent Cianci, Jr showcased the city's strength in arts and pushed for further revitalization, ultimately resulting in the uncovering of the city's natural rivers (which had been paved over), relocation of a large section of railroad underground, creation of Waterplace Park and river walks along the river's banks, and construction of the Fleet Skating Rink (now the Bank of America Skating Rink) downtown and the 1.4 million ft² Providence Place Mall.New investment triggered within the city, with new construction including numerous condo projects, hotels, and a new office high-rise all filling in the freed space. Despite new investment, poverty remains an entrenched problem as it does in most post-industrial New England cities. Nearly 30 percent of the city population lives below the poverty line. Recent increases in real estate values further exacerbate problems for those at marginal income levels, as Providence had the highest rise in median housing price of any city in the United States from 2004 to 2005. Geography The Providence city limits enclose a small geographic region, with a total area of 20.5 square miles (53.2 km²). 18.5 square miles (47.8 km²) of it is land and the remaining 2.1 square miles (5.3 km²) (roughly 10%) of it is water.Providence is located at the head of Narragansett Bay, with the Providence River running into the bay through the center of the city, formed by the confluence of the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket Rivers. The Waterplace Park amphitheater and riverwalks line the river's banks through downtown.Providence is one of many cities claimed, like Rome, to be founded on seven hills. The more prominent hills are: Constitution Hill (near downtown), College Hill (east of the Providence River), and Federal Hill (west of downtown and is New England's largest Italian district outside of Massachusetts). The other four are: Tockwotten Hill at Fox Point, Smith Hill (where the State House is located), Christian Hill at Hoyle Square (junction of Cranston & Westminster Streets), and Weybosset Hill at the lower end of Weybosset Street, which was leveled in the early 1880s. Neighborhoods Providence has 25 official neighborhoods, though these neighborhoods are often grouped together and referred to collectively:TheEast Sideis a region comprising the neighborhoods ofBlackstone,Hope(aka Summit),Mount Hope,College Hill, Wayland, andFox Point. TheJewelry Districtdescribes the area enclosed by I-95, the old I-195, and theProvidence River. The North End is formed by the combination of the neighborhoods ofCharlesandWanskuck. TheSouth Side(or South Providence) consists of the neighborhoods ofElmwood,Lower South Providence,Upper South Providence, and theWest End. West Broadway is an officially recognized neighborhood with its own association. It overlaps with the southern half ofFederal Hilland the northern part of the West End. The West Side is a vague term sometimes used to mean theWest End,Olneyville,Silver Lake, and nearby parts of abutting neighborhoods. Cityscape The city of Providence is geographically very compact, characteristic of eastern seaboard cities which developed prior to use of the automobile. It is among the most densely populated cities in the country. For this reason, Providence has the eighth-highest percentage of pedestrian commuters. The street layout is somewhat chaotic—over one thousand streets (a great number for the city's size) run haphazardly, connecting and radiating from traditionally bustling places like Market Square.Downtown Providence has numerous 19th century mercantile buildings in the Federal and Victorian architectural styles, as well as several post-modern and modernist buildings, are located throughout this area. In particular, a fairly clear spatial separation appears between the areas of pre-1980s development and post-1980s development. West Exchange Street and Exchange Terrace serve as rough boundaries between the two.The newer area, sometimes called 'Capitol Center', includes Providence Place Mall (1999), a Westin hotel (1993) and The Residences at the Westin (2007), GTECH (2006), Waterplace condominiums (2007), and Waterplace Park (1994); the area tends toward newer development since much of it is land reclaimed in the 1970s from a mass of railroad tracks which was referred to colloquially as the 'Chinese Wall'. This part of Downtown is characterized by open spaces, wide roads, and intent landscaping.The historic part of downtown has many streetscapes that look as they did eighty years ago. Many of the state's tallest buildings are found here. The largest structure, to date, is the art-deco-styled former Industrial Trust Tower, currently the Bank of America Building at 426 feet (130 m). By contrast, nearby to it is the second tallest One Financial Plaza, designed in modern taut-skin cladding, constructed a half century later. In between the two is 50 Kennedy Plaza. The Textron Tower is also a core building to the modest Providence skyline. Downtown is also the home of the Providence Biltmore and Westminster Arcade, the oldest enclosed shopping mall in the U.S., built in 1828.The city's southern waterfront, away from the downtown core, is the location of many oil tanks, a docking station for a ferry boat, a non-profit sailing center, bars, strip clubs, and power plants. The Russian Submarine Museum was located here until 2008, after the submarine sank in a storm and was declared a loss. The Fox Point Hurricane Barrier is also found here, built to protect Providence from storm surge, like that it had endured in the 1938 New England Hurricane and again in 1954 from Hurricane Carol.The majority of the cityscape comprises abandoned and revitalized industrial mills, double and triple decker housing (though the row houses found so commonly in other Northeast cities, are notably rare here), a small number of high-rise buildings (predominantly for housing the elderly), and single family homes. I-95 serves as a physical barrier between the city's commercial core and neighborhoods such as Federal Hill and the West End. Climate Providence's climate is between humid continental climate and humid subtropical climate, with warm summers, cold winters, and high humidity year-round. The USDA rates the city at Zone 6a, which is an 'in-between' climate. The influence of the Atlantic Ocean keeps Providence, and the rest of the state of Rhode Island, warmer than many inland locales in New England. January is the coldest month with a mean of 28.7 °F (−1.8 °C). July is the warmest month with an average of 73.3 °F (22.9 °C), with highs rising to 90 °F (32 °C) on 10 days per summer. Extremes range from −17 °F (−27 °C) in February 1934 to 104 °F (40 °C) in August 1975.As with the rest of the northeastern seaboard, Providence receives ample precipitation year-round. Monthly precipitation ranges from a high of 4.43 inches (112.5 mm) in March to a low of 3.17 inches (80.5 mm) in July. Precipitation levels are generally slightly lesser in the summer months than the winter months, when powerful storms known as Nor'easters can cause significant snowfall and blizzard conditions. Although hurricanes are not frequent in coastal New England, Providence's location at the head of Narragansett Bay makes it vulnerable to them. Demographics As of the census of 2000, the population comprised 173,618 people, 162,389 households, and 35,859 families. The population density was 9,401.7 inhabitants per square mile (3,629.4/km²), characteristic of comparatively older cities in New England such as New Haven, Connecticut; Boston, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut. Also like these cities, its population peaked in the 1940s just prior to the nationwide period of rapid suburbanization.Providence has had a substantial Italian population since the turn of the century, with 14% (a plurality) of the population claiming Italian ancestry. Italian influence manifests itself in Providence's Little Italy in Federal Hill. Irish immigrants have also had considerable influence on the city's history, with 8% of residents claiming Irish heritage.Belying Providence's traditionally white makeup is the sizable minority presence it has acquired in the last twenty years, embodied in the election of its first Latino mayor in 2010, Dominican-American Angel Taveras. Though nearby cities like Boston and Hartford have longer-standing black and Latino communities, Providence now surpasses both in the density of its minority population, with non-Hispanic whites comprising less than half (40.9%) of the population. Though salient contributions to this growth have been among Asians and unspecified races, the most dramatic change comes from Hispanics, whose presence has increased fivefold. Having origins in Puerto Rico, Colombia, Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, and Central America (particularly Guatemala), Hispanics have strong influence in the neighborhoods of Elmwood, the West End, and Upper and Lower South Providence. Hispanic impact is even larger in the city's schools. Hispanics represent over half (55%) of all students in the city's school system while comprising only 36% of Providence's population.In addition, Providence, like the nearby Massachusetts cities of Fall River and New Bedford, has a considerable community of immigrants from various Portuguese-speaking countries, living mostly in the areas of Washington Park and Fox Point. Portuguese is the city's third-largest nationality, (after Italian and Irish) at 4% of the population while Cape Verdeans make up another 2%.African Americans constitute approximately 17% of the city with the largest percentages in Mount Hope and Upper and Lower South Providence neighborhoods. Asians are 6% of Providence's population and have enclaves scattered throughout the city. Another 6% of the city has multiracial ancestry. Native Americans and Pacific Islanders make up the remaining 1.3%. With Liberians comprising 0.4% of the population, the city is home to the one of the three largest Liberian immigrant populations in the country.The Providence metropolitan area, which includes Providence, Fall River, Massachusetts, and Warwick is estimated to be 1,622,520. In 2006, this area was officially added to the Boston Combined Statistical Area (CSA), the fifth-largest CSA in the country. In the last fifteen years, Providence has experienced a sizable growth in its under-18 population, attributed to the influx of Hispanics. The median age of the city is 28 years, while the largest age cohort is 20 to 24 year olds, owing to the city's large student population.The per capita income, as of the 2000 census, was $15,525, which is well below both the state average of $29,113, and the national average of $21,587. The median income for a household was $26,867, and the median income for a family in Providence was $32,058, according to the 2000 census. The city has one of the highest rates of poverty in the nation with 29.1% of the population and 23.9% of families living below the poverty line in 2000, the largest concentrations being found in the city's Olneyville, and Upper and Lower South Providence areas. Poverty has affected children at a disproportionately higher rate with 40.1% of those under the age of 18 living below the poverty line, concentrated particularly west of downtown in the neighborhoods of Hartford, Federal Hill, and Olneyville. Crime Compared to the national average, Providence has a higher rate of property crime and an average rate of violent crime per 100,000 inhabitants. In 2009, there were 24 murders, the highest number since 2000 and a jump from the previous year's 13. Crime in all categories had been dropping substantially during 2002-2007, contrary to national trends. The nearby city of Worcester, Massachusetts which is about the same size had six murders in 2009 by comparison. The much larger city of Boston had 42. The police chief asserted that such violence was not stranger-to-stranger, but relationship driven. The pattern of violent crime was highly specific by neighborhood with vast majority of the murders taking place in the poorest sections of Providence, such as Washington Park, Fox Point Elmwood, South Providence and the West End.In 2003, of the 239 United States cities with populations over 100,000, Providence's violent crime rate ranked 84th, as compared with New York City at 94th and Boston at 28th. Providence has the fifth-highest rate of property crime per 100,000 inhabitants in the country. Burglary and car theft, in particular constitute 1.1 and 2.5 times the national average. Economy Providence was one of the first cities to industrialize in the United States. By 1830, the city had manufacturing industries in metals, machinery, textiles, jewelry, and silverware. Though manufacturing has declined, the city is still one of the largest centers for jewelry and silverware design and manufacturing. Services, particularly education, health care, and finance, also make up a large portion of the city's economy. Providence also is the site of a sectional center facility, a regional hub for the U.S. Postal Service. Since it is the capital of Rhode Island, Providence's economy additionally consists of government services.The Fortune 500 conglomerate Textron and Fortune 1000 company Nortek Incorporated are both headquartered in the city, and GTECH's world headquarters has recently been moved to downtown Providence. Citizens Bank is also headquartered in Providence. Another company whose origins were in the city is Fleet Bank. Once Rhode Island's largest bank, it moved its headquarters to Boston, Massachusetts, after acquiring Shawmut Bank in 1995. Before its acquisition by Bank of America, Fleet merged with BankBoston to become New England's largest commercial bank.The city is home to the Rhode Island Convention Center, which opened in December 1993. Along with a hotel, the convention center is connected to the Providence Place Mall, a major retail center, through a skywalk. The Port of Providence, the second largest deepwater seaport in New England, handles cargo such as cement, chemicals, heavy machinery, petroleum, and scrap metal. Top employers According to the City's 2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top ten employers in the city are: Government Providence serves as Rhode Island's capital, housing the Rhode Island General Assembly as well as the offices of the Governor and the Lieutenant Governor in the Rhode Island State House.Providence's city government has a mayor-council form of government. The Providence City Council consists of fifteen city councilors, one for each of the city's wards. The council is tasked with enacting ordinances and passing an annual budget. Providence also has probate and superior courts. The U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island is located downtown across from City Hall adjacent to Kennedy Plaza.David N. Cicilline will finish his term as mayor in 2010, 8 years after taking office as the first openly gay mayor of an American state capital. (notably, the second was elected 8 years later in neighboring Hartford, Connecticut.) Providence was the largest American city to have an openly gay mayor, until Sam Adams took office in Portland, Oregon on January 1, 2009.The city's first Latino mayor was elected in 2010, Angel Taveras, who assumed office January 3, 2011. Postsecondary The flagship campuses of five of Rhode Island's colleges and universities are in Providence (city proper):Brown University, anIvy Leagueuniversity and one of only ninecolonial collegesin the nation. Johnson & Wales University, notable for its prestigious College of Culinary Arts, College of Business, and Hospitality College. Providence College Rhode Island College Rhode Island School of Design(RISD), one of the country's top art colleges In addition, the Community College of Rhode Island (Downcity and Liston campuses) and University of Rhode Island (Providence campus) have satellite campuses in the city. Between these schools the number of postsecondary students is approximately 44,000. Compounded by Brown University's being the second-largest employer, higher education exerts a considerable presence in the city's politics and economy. Private and charter schools Several private schools, including Moses Brown, the Lincoln School, and the Wheeler School, are in the city's East Side. LaSalle Academy is located in the Elmhurst area of the city near Providence College. The public charter schools Time Squared Academy (K-12) and Textron Chamber of Commerce (9-12) are funded by GTECH and Textron respectively. In addition, the city's South Side houses Community Preparatory School, a private school serving primarily low-income students in grades 3-8. Within the semi-private schools, The Metropolitan Regional Career and Technical Center (The Met) and The Big Picture Company schools serve students through real world experiences and project-based learning. There are two separate centers for students with special needs. Public schools The Providence Public School District serves about 30,000 students from pre-Kindergarten to grade 12. The district has 25 elementary schools, nine middle schools, and thirteen high schools. The Providence Public School District features magnet schools at the middle and high school level, Nathanael Greene and Classical respectively. The overall graduation rate as of 2007 is 70.1%, which is close to the statewide rate of 71% and the national average of 70%. Culture Much of Providence culture is synonymous with Rhode Island culture. Like the state, the city has a non-rhotic accent which can be heard on local media. Providence also shares Rhode Island's affinity for coffee, as the former has the most coffee/doughnut shops per capita of any city in the country. Providence is also reputed to have the highest number of restaurants per capita, many of which are founded and/or staffed by its own Johnson & Wales University graduates.Providence has several ethnic neighborhoods, notably Federal Hill and the North End (Italian), Fox Point (Cape Verdean and Portuguese), West End (mainly Central American and Asians), and Smith Hill (Irish with miscellaneous enclaves of other groups). There are also many dedicated community organizations and arts associations located in the city.The city gained the reputation as one of the most active and growing LGBT communities in the Northeast; the rate of reported gay and lesbian relationships is 75% higher than the national average and Providence has been named among the 'Best Lesbian Places to Live'. The former mayor, David Cicilline, won his election running as an openly gay man, making him the first openly gay mayor of a U.S. state capital. Former Mayor Cianci instituted the position of Mayor's Liaison to the Gay and Lesbian community in the 1990s. There are numerous social and community organizations supporting the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community. Providence is home to the largest gay bathhouse in New England.During the summer months, the city regularly hosts WaterFire, an environmental art installation that consists of about 100 bonfires that blaze just above the surface of the three rivers that pass through the middle of downtown Providence. There are multiple Waterfire events that are accompanied by various pieces of classical and world music. The public art displays, most notably sculptures, change on a regular basis.The city is also the home of the Tony Award-winning theater group Trinity Repertory Company, the Providence Black Repertory Company, and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. Providence is also the home of several performing arts centers such as the Veterans Memorial Auditorium, the Providence Performing Arts Center, and the Providence Festival Ballet. The city's underground music scene, centered around artist-run spaces such as the now-defunct Fort Thunder, is known in underground music circles. Sites of interest Providence is home to an 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) park system, notably Waterplace Park and Riverwalk, Roger Williams Park, Roger Williams National Memorial, and Prospect Terrace Park, the latter featuring expansive views of the downtown area. As one of the first cities in the country, Providence contains many historic buildings while the East Side neighborhood in particular includes the largest contiguous area of buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the U.S. with many pre-revolutionary houses. The East Side is also home to the First Baptist Church in America, the oldest Baptist church in the Americas, founded by Roger Williams in 1638, as well as the Old State House, which served as the state's capitol from 1762 to 1904. Nearby is Roger Williams National Memorial. Downcity Providence is home to the fourth largest unsupported dome in the world (the second largest marble dome after St. Peter's Basilica in Rome), as well as the Westminster Arcade, which is the oldest enclosed shopping center in the U.S.The main art museum is the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, which has the twentieth largest collection in the country. In addition to the Providence Public Library and its nine branches, the city is home to the Providence Athenæum, the fourth oldest library in the country. Here, on one of his many visits to Providence, Edgar Allan Poe, met and courted a love interest named Sarah Helen Whitman. Poe was a regular fixture there, as was H. P. Lovecraft (who was born in Providence); both of them influential writers of gothic literature.The Bank of America Skating Center, formerly the Fleet Skating Center, is located near Kennedy Plaza in the downtown district, connected by pedestrian tunnel to Waterplace Park, a cobblestone and concrete park below street traffic that abuts Providence's three rivers.The southern part of the city is home to the famous roadside attraction Nibbles Woodaway (also known as the 'Big Blue Bug'), the world's largest termite, as well as the aforementioned Roger Williams Park, which contains a zoo, a botanical center, and the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium. Sports The city is home to the USA Rugby League team Rhode Island Rebellion, which plays at Classical High School. The Rhode Island Rebellion is a member of the USA Rugby League (USARL) which is the source for high-level, semi-professional Rugby League competition in the USA. The Rhode Island Rebellion recognizes its mission to serve club members, the State of Rhode Island and the Country. Its dual focus is to provide an opportunity for interested persons to participate in organized activities to achieve their maximum athletic and skillful potential in Rugby League, and to provide Rhode Islanders with an Exciting Team to become apart of. It's inaugural season begins June 4, 2011 at 8 pm.Rebellion's WebsiteThe city is also home to the American Hockey League team Providence Bruins, which plays at the Dunkin' Donuts Center (formerly the Providence Civic Center). From 1926 to 1972, the AHL's Providence Reds (renamed the Rhode Island Reds in their last years) played at the Rhode Island Auditorium. In 1972, the team relocated to the Providence Civic Center, where they played until moving to Binghamton, New York, in 1977.The NFL's New England Patriots and MLS's New England Revolution play in Foxborough, Massachusetts, which is situated halfway between Providence and Boston. Providence was formerly home to two major league franchises: the NFL's Providence Steam Roller in the 1920s and 1930s, and the NBA's Providence Steamrollers in the 1940s. The city is also where Rocky Marciano won 29 of his 49 fights.The city's defunct baseball team, the Providence Grays, competed in the National League from 1879 through 1885. The team defeated the New York Metropolitans in baseball's first successful 'world championship series' in 1884. In 1914, after the Boston Red Sox purchased Babe Ruth from the then-minor league Baltimore Orioles, the team prepared Ruth for the major leagues by sending him to finish the season playing for a minor league team in Providence that was also known as the Grays. Today, professional baseball is offered by the Pawtucket Red Sox, the AAA affiliate of the Boston Red Sox which plays in nearby Pawtucket. Most baseball fans—along with the local media—tend to follow the Boston Red Sox.Major colleges and universities fielding NCAA Division I athletic teams are Brown University and Providence College. The latter is a member of the Big East Conference. Much local hype is associated with games between these two schools or the University of Rhode Island. Providence has also hosted the alternative sports event Gravity Games from 1999 to 2001, and was also the first host of ESPN's X Games, known in its first edition as the Extreme Games, in 1995. Providence has its own roller derby league. Formed in 2004, it currently has four teams: the Providence Mob Squad, the Sakonnet River Roller Rats, the Old Money Honeys, and the Rhode Island Riveters. Health and medicine Providence is home to eight hospitals, most prominently Rhode Island Hospital, the largest general acute care hospital in the state. The hospital is in a complex along I-95 that includes Hasbro Children's Hospital and Women and Infants Hospital. The city is also home to the Roger Williams Medical Center, St. Joseph Hospital For Specialty Care (a division of St. Joseph Health Services Of Rhode Island), The Miriam Hospital, a major teaching affiliate associated with the Alpert Medical School of Brown University, as well as a VA medical center.The Rhode Island Blood Center has its main headquarters in Providence. Since 1979, the Rhode Island Blood Center has been the sole organization in charge of blood collection and testing and distribution of blood products t

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